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ADS-B - what practical relevance in Europe?

Is there a published European mandate for ADS-B Out?

Here in the US, we have an equipment mandate for ADS-B Out (transmit only) to fly into certain airspace. It has an effective date of Jan 1, 2020. The mandate covers all flights in the subject airspace. The airspace where the mandate applies is: All Class A, B, and C airspace, Class B 30 NM veil and under the Class B while in Class E, all Class E above 10,000 MSL. US airspace is Class A above 18000 MSL. Class B is used for major airports and requires a clearance. Class C is for regional airports and requires radio contact prior to entry. Class E is most of the rest of the airspace above 1200 AGL, in some places 700 AGL. The equippage requirement

In the US, there are two ADSB links, one based on the mode S transponder 1090ES (1090 MHz – RTCA DO 260-B) and the other link based on UAT (Universal Access Transceiver – 978 MHz RTCA DO 282B). Both links may be used below 18000 MSL, above that altitude, the 1090ES link must be used. In the US, the GBT (Ground Based Transceiver) provide services to aircraft that are equipped with both ADS-B Out and ADS-B In (Receiver) to glue the two links together, provide traffic information on non participating aircraft, and in the case of the UAT link, provide weather and NOTAM data to the cockpit.

In Canada, I understand that ADS-B is available in the Hudson Bay area above FL290 using 1090ES. The following is from Transport Canada AC 700-009:

ADS-B is not being mandated in Canada in the near term. It is acknowledged that ADS-B technology will supplement the current ground-based radar surveillance system and may eventually replace it to some extent, however, the intent of not mandating the ADS-B system is to allow owners and operators to volunteer their participation in a surveillance system where NAV CANADA will offer ADS-B and to benefit from its advantages. Air operators wishing to benefit from the advantages of ADS-B surveillance will be able to do so by meeting specific aircraft ADS-B considerations as presented in this AC. An installation approval issued under CAR Part V Subpart 21 will be required if the applicable aircraft equipment to enable ADS-B surveillance needs to be installed. There are currently several hundred aircraft transmitting extended squitter messages from Mode S transponders. Many of the installations meet some of the requirements in EASA AMC 20-24. Those that meet all of the mandatory requirements may have an approved AFM that contains a statement of compliance to EASA AMC 20-24. Aircraft models that do not have the EASA AMC 20-24 compliance statement are not eligible to receive ADS-B services from NAV CANADA or from air navigation service providers in areas of Europe and the Atlantic Ocean. EASA AMC 20-24 is recognized as the standard for ADS-B performance in non-radar areas. It establishes the interoperability requirements that permit air traffic services to be provided.

Australia has a mandate for IFR operations using 1090ES Out. This mandate is quite different from the US which does not distinguish IFR/VFR but specifies airspace where all aircraft must be equipped. From the airservicesaustralia.com website:

A new era in air traffic surveillance became reality on 12 December 2013 with the first fitment mandate for Automatic Dependant Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) technology coming into effect for all Instrument Flight Rule (IFR) aircraft flying at or above 29 000 feet in Australia’s airspace.

On 16 August 2012, the Director of Aviation Safety, CASA made instruments for a phased requirement for all IFR aircraft to be equipped for ADS-B by 2 February 2017. This applies to all Australian aircraft and will enhances Airservices capability to provide safe and efficient air traffic management services.

2014 – IFR Forward fit: Any aircraft that is first registered on or after 6 February 2014 and is operated under the IFR must carry serviceable ADS-B transmitting equipment that complies with the CASA Civil Aviation Order (CAOs) 20.18 and Civil Aviation Order (CAO) 20.18 Amendment Instrument 2012 (No. 1).

2016 – IFR for Western Australia: On and after 4 February 2016, an aircraft that is operated under the IFR in Airspace that is Class A, B, C or E and within the arc of a circle that starts 500 NM true north fromPerthaerodrome and finishes 500 NM true east fromPerth Airport must carry serviceable ADS-B transmitting equipment that complies with Civil Aviation Order 20.18 and Civil Aviation Order (CAO) 20.18 Amendment Instrument 2012 (No. 1).

2017 – All IFR aircraft: On and after 2 February 2017, any aircraft that is first registered before 6 February 2014 and is operated under the IFR must carry serviceable ADS-B transmitting equipment that complies with Civil Aviation Order 20.18 and Civil Aviation Order (CAO) 20.18 Amendment Instrument 2012 (No. 1).

I see the following in Wikipedia, but it is not validated with an authoritative source:

In the EU airspace planes with a weight above 5,700 kilograms (12,600 lb) or a max cruise of over 250 knots will be required to carry ADS-B from 2017 (new planes from 2015).

KUZA
In the EU airspace planes with a weight above 5,700 kilograms (12,600 lb) or a max cruise of over 250 knots will be required to carry ADS-B from 2017 (new planes from 2015).

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 1207/2011 requires this in Europe as you say.

Link and mandatory second line….

Last Edited by JasonC at 10 Jun 17:06
EGTK Oxford

This new Avidyne offer (somewhat ironic since they can barely ship the IFD540 at present) is interesting.

I wonder if anybody in Europe should go for this.

No TCAS systems make use of ADS-B and AFAIK no GA TAS/TCAS systems (meaning: Garmin, Ryan/Avidyne or Honeywell) will display targets based on ADS-B emissions. Is that correct?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

No TCAS systems make use of ADS-B and AFAIK no GA TAS/TCAS systems (meaning: Garmin, Ryan/Avidyne or Honeywell) will display targets based on ADS-B emissions. Is that correct?

I haven’t fully plunged into this, but it is my understanding that Power Flarm does.

PS slightly curious but not enough to find out for myself: what is the (catalogue) price for said IFD540? Must be hefty, if they afford $4250 incentive.

Last Edited by at 24 Sep 10:53
EBZH Kiewit, Belgium

That information is incorrect.

Again ADS-B is a very powerfull feature, that will get used more and more in both USA and Europe. For the European version of ADS-B their is 1090 MHz ADS-B out, and ADS-B in. ADS-B out (transmission of ADS-B data) is generally done with the mode S transponder (Trig TT-21, TT-22, TT-31, Garrecht VT-01, VT-02, VT-2000, Filser TRT-800, TRT-800A, TRT-800H, Garmin GTX-330ES to list a few). It requires these transponder to be used with a GPS source.

For ADS-B in (receiving ADS-B data from other aircraft (European system) requires a seperate receiver. This is possible with Garrecht TRX-1000, TRX-1500, TRX-2000, Garmin GTS-800, GTS-825, GTS-855, GDL-39, Avidyne TAS-600 systems to list a few).

ADS-B IN / OUT IAW European 1090 MHz uses is possible with MOST modern avionics. It will be the future as the price is much lower then any active traffic systems combined with an accuracy which far exceeds anything other methodes.

Do note that TCAS and TAS or not the same, in general in general aviation you will find only TAS due to cost. TCAS systems communicate with eachother to give you a resolution. TAS does not do that, and “only” warns you for other traffic.

JP-Avionics
EHMZ

I haven’t fully plunged into this, but it is my understanding that Power Flarm does.

That is correct

PS slightly curious but not enough to find out for myself: what is the (catalogue) price for said IFD540? Must be hefty, if they afford $4250 incentive.

List price is 16.995 US$

JP-Avionics
EHMZ

that will get used more and more in both USA and Europe

“will”…

Can you be specific, Jesse, about timescales and the actual operational capability which will be delivered to GA?

My Q was about the current situation. We all know ADS-B is really nice and clever stuff and could be used for more even more clever stuff.

That information is incorrect.

Which bit is incorrect?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

No TCAS systems make use of ADS-B and AFAIK no GA TAS/TCAS systems (meaning: Garmin, Ryan/Avidyne or Honeywell) will display targets based on ADS-B emissions. Is that correct?

This bit is incorrect, it does for the equipement listed.

Can you be specific, Jesse, about timescales and the actual operational capability which will be delivered to GA?

There is a mandatory ADS-B out mandate in the US with a deadline of 2020 for airspace which require a transponder.
There is no mandatory ADS-B out mandate in Europe at this time for general aviation. It is not unlikely to get a ADS-B mandate in Europe as well. I would expect for IFR / controlled airports first. ADS-B out will give the ATC controller a much better resolution image and can give him more information such as on your next selected waypoint etc. Also ground operations do benefit from ADS-B. As ground controllers can see your aircraft with a much better resolution that with ground radar, while also be able to see airport authorities cars for example on that same screen. This would potentially lower runway incursions.

ADS-B in (and also ADS-B) get the most out of the potential if it is widely used, so a mandate seems logical.

JP-Avionics
EHMZ

It IS the future Peter. So I’d say, yea, by all means. To upgrade any transponder today which is not ADSB-Out capable is simply not very clever, as it will be required at some stage anyway.

Not sure about the certified TCAS Systems, but quite a few others do use ADS-B. Power Flarm (which is one of the most popular) as well as the TRX devices which can be coupled with Garmin portables use ADS-B out signals for their systems. Several more are in the works too. So if you do transmit the ADS-B out data, if nothing else you will make yourself visible to a lot of GA common systems. So if it is free with a box you are considering to buy anyway, it sounds like a very interesting offer indeed.

LSZH, Switzerland

Controllers at a towered airport will get no extra information out of adsb vs mode s once the aircraft enters the ctr. Next waypoint? Lol. Most GA is vfr @ 110kts… what diff is next wpt going to make?

There will be eventually no mandate for adsb as airlines have no interest in it as opposed to the currently installed kit. See the fiasco of mode S in the states.

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