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EASA Intent to revoke TCs for PA-25, Bellanca, Champion 7 & 8 aircraft

I’m cross-posting this here from our Swedish forum as it might be of interest to people:

https://www.easa.europa.eu/type-certificates-information

According to a person in the Swedish CAA this means (loose translation, don’t cite me on that):

Information 2018-7 is about the fact that EASA intends to revoke EASA’s type certificate (TC) for Piper PA-25 Pawnee. Possibility for comments from individuals exists, read the newsletter.

Information 2018-8 is about the fact that EASA intends to revoke EASA’s type certificate (TC) for Bellanca and Champion 7 och 8 series. Possibility for comments from individuals exists, read the newsletter.

EASA informs that they INTEND to do this, but they have not decided (see the newsletters), due to the fact that the TC-holders haven’t paid the annual fee (that will cover continuous type certificate work) to EASA. We can hope that the TC-holders will pay in time.
[…]
A revoked EASA type certificate means that the EASA-aircraft is no longer airworthy within EU, because the prerequisite for the certificate of airworthiness to be valid, is missing. In other words the aircraft will become “grounded”, if nothing else is announced.
[…]
EASA decides about the airworthiness in these cases, not the Swedish CAA. They can decide if these aircraft will continue to be considered Annex-II aircraft, but this is less likely to be decided. Such a decision may only be taken by EASA.

Right now it feels like more information from EASA and a decision are missing. Ask your questions directly to EASA, contact information in the newsletters.

https://www.easa.europa.eu/specific-airworthiness-specifications-sass-information
https://www.easa.europa.eu/type-certificates-information
Last Edited by Dimme at 30 Apr 09:32
^ESM[ES]$

Upon the TC revocation, would these become “non EASA aircraft”?

This is a funny one

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

They will be orphans and therefore only continue to be operated if they hold a restricted certificate of airworthiness or a permit to fly.

Maybe one can move them to the N-registry.

^ESM[ES]$

From here this is quite an eye-opener. Not the initial fee (which is always high because you have to pay 3rd parties to generate design data and this is true for EASA or FAA) but the ongoing fee.

This explains why a TC holder presiding over a small number of aircraft may well want to abandon the TC

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Orphaned airplanes are operated under Annex 2 if I understand this correctly.

Can they be grounded? It appears like as Airbus has in the past done this e.g. to the operators of the SE210 Caravelle, by unlaterally surrendering the TC and by threatening the same for Concorde, had the Brits not relented.

So in theory, any manufacturer failing to pay his dues to EASA can risk their European fleet to be grounded or at least transferred into orphan status and Annex 2. For instance, I was not aware that the Cougar has lost it’s EASA type certificate, so how do the remaining ones operate? There are quite a few in Europe.

LSZH, Switzerland

My understanding from the Swedish CAA representative message is that they don’t automatically become Annex II, this is something that EASA can do if they want, though highly unlikely.

^ESM[ES]$

In the UK, moving a particular type to Annex 2 has been heavily resisted by the CAA because it opens up more flexible maintenance, away from (what is today) Part M, and the CAA loses money (because the fees go to the LAA instead, unless you are looking at say a Spitfire which is on a CAA permit), and the Part M companies lose money (so they lobby hard under the table to block the moves, and the CAA obviously supports them).

And EASA has the same revenue stream protection incentives as any national CAA.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Dimme wrote:

Maybe one can move them to the N-registry.

Yes, if an aircraft type has an FAA TC, barring some really extreme safety related issue, it will be type certified forever.

Peter wrote:

And EASA has the same revenue stream protection incentives as any national CAA.

Well, then withdrawing TC’s does not make any sense as it will ground the airplanes in question and therefore stop generating any money at all.

LSZH, Switzerland

Aircraft without TC support can go onto the EASA ‘Orphaned’ list but don’t necessarily become Annex 11.

Here is the current small aircraft list with the orphaned ones on pages 26 and 27:

https://www.easa.europa.eu/download/easa-product-lists/EASA-PRODUCT-LIST-Small-Aeroplanes.pdf

Last Edited by wigglyamp at 30 Apr 16:33
Avionics geek.
Fairoaks. EGTF
26 Posts
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