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Bristell Energic (H55) certified electric plane

First flight of the (to be) CS23 certified Swiss electric trainer, the Bristell Energic

From the Solar Impulse team. To be used as a trainer, 90 minutes endurance.




It looks almost exactly like an Aquila A211 from the outside, which in turn looks similar to many other aircraft. Why do all modern two sweaters look the same?

Still, looks like the ideal airplane for the typical 1 hr training flight or just doing lots of circuits.

Novice pilot
EDVM Hildesheim

MedEwok wrote:

Why do all modern two s-w-eaters look the same?

Why do all bicycles look the same, or airliners, or family cars or … ? The answer is that within the constraints of space, air density, cost, performance, materials, weight, strength, practicalities, “mission” and so on, the best overall solution that answer all those question ends up being the same. You cannot do it better any other way. You can certainly do it different, but not better, all things considered. This is the optimal design of a general purpose two seat aircraft, pure and simple.

A bush plane would look different, an aerobatic plane would look different.

MedEwok wrote:

Still, looks like the ideal airplane for the typical 1 hr training flight or just doing lots of circuits.

Indeed, and at the fraction of the cost of an AVGAS powered aircraft. People will also push the limits. Who will be the first to fly across Europe in an electric (battery) powered aircraft? Who will be the first to fly around the world? The main change is that since flight academies and eventually clubs will go for this of economical reasons, the next generation of pilots will all have had their basic training in electric battery powered aircraft. To them, battery power will not be something odd, strange or restricted, it will be their “first love” so to speak. They will have no adverse thought about it whatsoever. It still will be a long time before big jets turn electric, if ever, but there are other markets that electric aircraft will fill just fine.

Very sexy, as the call sign says!

The Pipistrel Alpha Electro has the ability to do quick change of batteries, which provides more flexibility, for instance by putting sets of batteries in various airfields and thus enabling the overland flying part of the training.

All in all, great to see that the right steps are made.

Last Edited by aart at 23 Jun 08:57
Private field, Mallorca, Spain

MedEwok wrote:

It looks almost exactly like an Aquila A211 from the outside, which in turn looks similar to many other aircraft. Why do all modern two sweaters look the same?

You mean it has low wings, two seats side by side and an engine upfront?

A211:

Bristell BRM:

But if you punch the same requirements into the same formulas, you’ll end up with similar results.

mh
Inside the sky.
EDXE, EDXF, Germany

OK, so the aircraft/airframe is already certified as an LSA or VLA? What the Solar Impulse team puts to the table is the electric propulsion system, a certified version and needed modifications etc?

The test pilot not being able to recover from a spin in this type (NG whatever) certainly is an eye-opening video.



Electric tech is great. Just let’s have it in better thought out airframes.

U206F, J3 Sea, PA32R & others
EIBR

WilliamF wrote:

The test pilot not being able to recover from a spin in this type (NG whatever)

And the relevance to the Bristell Energic is?

LeSving wrote:

OK, so the aircraft/airframe is already certified as an LSA or VLA?

The B23 is on it’s way to CS-23 certification. Hence the name.

LeSving wrote:

What the Solar Impulse team puts to the table is the electric propulsion system, a certified version and needed modifications etc?

H55 sells the propulsion system: https://www.h55.ch/products

mh
Inside the sky.
EDXE, EDXF, Germany

aart wrote:

The Pipistrel Alpha Electro has the ability to do quick change of batteries, which provides more flexibility, for instance by putting sets of batteries in various airfields and thus enabling the overland flying part of the training.

I talked to the Pipistrel people at AERO about this and they firmly advised against planning to operate with battery changes. They said that it would take about 30 minutes to change batteries and that you can’t do it without tools. They also said that it would not take much longer than that to get the batteries essentially fully charged provided you had not used any of the final reserve capacity.

Last Edited by Airborne_Again at 23 Jun 10:49
ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden
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