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Certification to use equipment

As a non-IR rated pilot, but IMCr rated (which may or may not be relevant), is anyone aware that I cant fly IFR on my Garmin GNS430W? When I say IFR, in my case it is following IFR rules, using waypoints but largely outside controlled airspace. I am flying an N reg, in the UK, and in this example on the privileges of my JAR licence.

The topic came up as I was talking to an FAA qualified instructor and we discussed a route I was planning. I stated that I was planning to fly via waypoints, loaded into the GNS430W, with traditional VOR navigation as a backup should be there be a GPS problem. He thought (but wasn't 100% sure) that to use certified IFR equipment like the GNS430W, you had to have some kind of accreditation/qualification to use it, something that would be implied if you had a full IR, as GPS approaches and GPS use are part of the syllabus these days (in some places I guess).

My thoughts are 1: this only rings true for much more complex fully integrated systems like the Garmin G1000, and even then I am not sure if a qualification is mandatory 2: what about old IR holders who never did GPS approaches in their IR skills test 3: who is going to be able to tell what I use anyhow.

Thoughts?

That's wrong. You need a logbook entry to use an EFIS (such as G1000) but not for GPS. You can fly any waypoints and you can use a sextant or an IFR GPS, as you like. As long as you stay VMC, you can do what you please.

As a non-IR rated pilot, but IMCr rated (which may or may not be relevant), is anyone aware that I cant fly IFR on my Garmin GNS430W?

You certainly can.

The topic came up as I was talking to an FAA qualified instructor and we discussed a route I was planning. I stated that I was planning to fly via waypoints, loaded into the GNS430W, with traditional VOR navigation as a backup should be there be a GPS problem. He thought (but wasn't 100% sure) that to use certified IFR equipment like the GNS430W, you had to have some kind of accreditation/qualification to use it,

He should not be instructing... Is he a real instructor? Even in the USA that is not true. He sounds like a very traditional UK PPL school FI who might have done an FAA PPL or something. But any FAA CFI or CFII should know this.

My thoughts are 1: this only rings true for much more complex fully integrated systems like the Garmin G1000

Are there any GA types which require such training? I don't know of any. Insurance requirements aside, a plain PPL can buy any plane within his PPL privilege, with a G1000, and just fly off in it, with no avionics training.

You need a logbook entry to use an EFIS (such as G1000) but not for GPS

That must be a German thing...

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Thanks for the comments so far. The instructor is someone who has spent a number of years travelling and teaching in far eastern countries, and was just visiting the UK briefly, but I wonder if he has either picked up some strange regulation or rumour elsewhere. He doesn't teach the IR or glass cockpit, and while he is young, I guess he is ''traditional".

My thoughts are 1: this only rings true for much more complex fully integrated systems like the Garmin G1000

Are there any GA types which require such training? I don't know of any. Insurance requirements aside, a plain PPL can buy any plane within his PPL privilege, with a G1000, and just fly off in it, with no avionics training.

Yes, anything with an EFIS. I don't know about the FAA requirements, but under JAA/EASA you need signoff for EFIS systems. This works the same as signoff for variable prop, retractable gear etc - the instructor signs your logbook when he's satisfied you're OK. I think that in the case of an EFIS, that signoff is then only valid on that particular model. I have signoff for the Aspen (which I have in my TB10) and Avidyne (which I flew for a few hours VFR in switzerland).

One interesting quirk is that the signoff can be VFR only. My Aspen signoff was VFR, then I did my IMCr test using the same setup - which automatically grants me the right to use it IFR.

2: what about old IR holders who never did GPS approaches in their IR skills test

For private ops no specific training is mandated for GPS approaches (although it is strongly recommended...). PRNAV approval does require some ground theory training, but its nothing too onerous (there is apparently an online King Schools course that you can do in a couple of hours).

3: who is going to be able to tell what I use anyhow.

That's really the whole point! All of the regulations mandate carriage, not use. Of course if you do something really negligent, and this can be proved after the accident, your insurance might not pay out...

EGEO

You need a logbook entry to use an EFIS (such as G1000) but not for GPS

That must be a German thing...

It seems so indeed! JAR-FCL 1.205 specifies the class rating subvariants such as retractable undercarriage and variable pitch propeller and the German version of it also contains a variant for EFIS!

I know someone (seen him in the mirror) who's received his EFIS endorsement from a FI that has never flown with an EFIS!

There is no FAA EFIS signoff to my knowledge. That instructor sounds like he has no idea. You can navigate any way you like. Ignore him.

EGTK Oxford

It seems so indeed! JAR-FCL 1.205 specifies the class rating subvariants such as retractable undercarriage and variable pitch propeller and the German version of it also contains a variant for EFIS!

I almost can't believe this!! Weren't the JAR-FCL rules supposed to be at least broadly the same across all JAR countries??

Frankfurt (EDFZ, EDFE), Germany
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