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Crash LPCS (also engine failure probability on a twin)

For me, it would depend on whether I was in control of the type and maintenance of the plane I was flying.

Also, having spoken to a number of people and having done a bit of nosing around I have been completely cured of any desire to own most homebuilts and especially any Lancair, including the Evolution… The RV is a lot better, if built the right way.

But this was a certified aircraft, with two engines. How far from the runway is the crash site?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

To you pilots, can I humbly ask, how that kind of tragic accidents, make you, eventually, (re)consider your taste for flying ?

Most of us probably naïvely tell ourselves that could never happen to me, either because we’re too careful, or comfort ourselves with statistics.

There definitely is a lot you can do to reduce your changes of being in an accident (proper walk around checks before every flight, carrying way more fuel than you need, avoiding in difficult conditions and being rigorous about diverting if things start to get too bad).

But the reality is that there are accidents that no matter how good we are, we just can’t avoid.

Personally, for the love I get out of flying, it’s worth the risk. But if human lifespan was extended to 1000 years, I’d not be flying a SEP! Then the risks would probably be too high for me.

EIWT Weston

dublinpilot wrote:

Personally, for the love I get out of flying, it’s worth the risk. But if human lifespan was extended to 1000 years, I’d not be flying a SEP! Then the risks would probably be too high for me.

It’s true that risk management only needs to limit the chance of an accident until you pass on for another reason.

I’m very sorry to hear of this accident, as with any. In answer to the question, I’ve never been one to entirely stop doing anything because of risk, instead I’ve managed the risk of participation in some way. For flying, my particular approach is to own and fly simple aircraft with reliable, maintainable components in good weather. It’s what I enjoy anyway.

Peter wrote:

But this was a certified aircraft, with two engines. How far from the runway is the crash site?

And turbines. The crash site is about 500m from the runway, very close. Here is a picture from another forum:

PetitCessnaVoyageur wrote:

To you pilots, can I humbly ask, how that kind of tragic accidents, make you, eventually, (re)consider your taste for flying ?

Normally not. I do everything I can to make my flying as safe as possible. If however it should turn out that this aeroplane was either shot down or someone placed a bomb on board (the only two explanations I would have for mid-air explosion as seen by those eyewitnesses, whatever their observation is worth – because JetA1 fuel does not easily make explosive mixtures with air like AVGAS) then this would be a first this kind of aviation in Europe – of which I am also a part. And it would scare me to some degree.

EDDS - Stuttgart

But if human lifespan was extended to 1000 years, I’d not be flying a SEP!

As you are aware @dublinpilot on the two occassions I might have wished for that, both engines would have stopped at the same time… And this has been proved on the DA42 also; both engines have actually stopped at the same time in the same conditions as the aforementioned.

the only two explanations I would have for mid-air explosion as seen by those eyewitnesses, whatever their observation is worth

Probably, it is one thing to hear a loud noise and another to see an explosion. I can’t find any more reports however.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

on the two occassions I might have wished for that, both engines would have stopped at the same time…

This assuming of course that all engines follow the Lycoming fuel servo design – Continental ones most noticeably don’t… . Stick, horse, immobile.

EFATO not handled correctly? Left engine maybe, judging from crash site position. But of course it’s hard to tell before getting any reliable information; it’s pure guessing and probably should be avoided.

LDZA LDVA, Croatia

PetitCessnaVoyageur wrote:

To you pilots, can I humbly ask, how that kind of tragic accidents, make you, eventually, (re)consider your taste for flying ?

The certainty of death has never stopped me from living, so the answer is no.

Last Edited by 172driver at 18 Apr 18:28

What Next, that photograph is interesting. I listened to an ATC recording of the departure. The clearance was right turn out to intercept a 330 radial. The aircraft was then cleared to take off, and seconds prior to the crash, the controller asks the pilot to do an immediate right turn…

Would appear to be an EFATO incident.

Fly safe. I want this thing to land l...
EGPF Glasgow

172driver wrote:

The certainty of death has never stopped me from living, so the answer is no.

I love you, Americans !
Joking of course, and I thank you for this straightforward answer.

dublinpilot wrote:

Most of us probably naïvely tell ourselves that could never happen to me

We do I guess, and maybe it’s that way we manage to fly. Up to a point, for what I have been reading here about individual self-inquiry.

BeechBaby wrote:

Would appear to be an EFATO incident.

Makes the light twin aircraft, even with turboprop, a tricky beast definitely.
(This is purely theoretical consideration, as I am SEP-only.)

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