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EASA-FAA FCL treaty indefinitely postponed

This rumour appears to be verified.

This (among other threads on EuroGA) is the background.

What this means is that the current postponement, April 2017, is likely to be postponed further.

Until then, FAA licensed pilots can fly on their papers in Europe without needing to get European equivalent papers.

Nobody I know knows the reason for why the negotiations got nowhere.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Sound like a good news…

Romain

LFPT Pontoise, LFPB

I wouldn’t count on it being good news. The endless deferments have been in the expectation of a useful BASA. If the BASA is dead in the water (the only rumour I have heard is that it won’t happen this year) then that could be a call to action in EASA and EC to finally nail the issue, and not let it drag on.

The three possible nailings are:

  1. Forget about it, put it in the “too difficult” bin
  2. Insist that EU residents have an EASA licence and ratings
  3. Invoke a unilateral 61.75 type arrangement

I am not a betting man, but if I had to, I would put my money on (3).

There are those here who know more about this than me, but I believe that they are, at least for the moment, gagged.

EGKB Biggin Hill

Invoke a unilateral 61.75 type arrangement

What would that be?

If Europe implemented what the USA does, it would be fairly easy i.e. a validation of the PPL, and a validation of the IR with one written exam, and both lasting for ever.

The issue of the large number of FAA CPL/IRs and ATPs flying N-reg (and other N based registries) bizjets still remains, and while it has been fashionable to dismiss them on GA forums, they have proven quite correct about the future, for the last 5-10 years.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

What is BASA ?

EBZH Kiewit, Belgium

Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement

EGKB Biggin Hill

Peter wrote:

What would that be?

My guess is that nobody has much idea at the moment.

I think that the main motivation is for the EASA states to have some oversight and enforcement capability with respect to their own nationals flying in their own airspace.

If that is right, then the acquisition of a 61.75 would probably be quite easy and lightweight, but that it could be taken away as a disciplinary measure.

For example, consider the work that is being done on infringement enforcement in the UK. The biggest weapon in the armoury is instant suspension of licence. That would seem somewhat unfair if it did not apply to foreign licence holders.

EGKB Biggin Hill

Timothy wrote:

The three possible nailings are:

  1. Forget about it, put it in the “too difficult” bin
  2. Insist that EU residents have an EASA licence and ratings
  3. Invoke a unilateral 61.75 type arrangement

I am not a betting man, but if I had to, I would put my money on (3).

As I understand the BASA (Bi-lateral Aviation Safety Agreement) licensing document (although I have not seen the IP and I am not even sure it exists yet), it offers a rather cumbersome path from FAA certificates to EASA licenses, with potentially the need to pass some theoretical exams in the process. That would however provide a “full” EASA license. What is described is very similar in spirit to what is currently in place for the FAA IR to EASA IR conversion through the CB-IR path.

If a 61.75 type arrangement would satisfy the requirement for EU residents to have EASA licenses and ratings, wouldn’t you say that it would be even better than the license conversion path described above? Those who currently have an FAA 61.75 (probably) already have EASA papers. Those who have “full” US certificates would have to get an EASA 61.75 if they do not already have an EASA license.

Those who fly SET would of course be screwed, because you can bet the EASA license would be limited to SEP. And if I were a betting man , I would bet that the IR would not be automatically transferred but would need to be added through the CB-IR route, i.e. min 50 hrs PIC IFR and a skill test including oral interrogation in air law, performance, met… But on the other hand that is probably one of the goals of this whole thing.

Timothy wrote:

My guess is that nobody has much idea at the moment.

Exactly. But a man is allowed to dream, and until you wrote that, I had excluded from my mind the idea that EASA would ever do a 61.75 because it sounded just too easy. But thinking about it now, it kind of makes sense.

Last Edited by at 07 Jun 12:45
LFPT, LFPN

For example, consider the work that is being done on infringement enforcement in the UK. The biggest weapon in the armoury is instant suspension of licence. That would seem somewhat unfair if it did not apply to foreign licence holders.

But that’s never going to apply to foreign licence holders. This idea might give the UK access to EASA licences (issued by the CAA) on the basis of a FAA Airmans Cert. But it won’t give the CAA any say over a French EASA licence for example (or indeed a French licence issued on the basis of an FAA Airmans Cert.).

Last Edited by dublinpilot at 07 Jun 12:58
EIWT Weston

Timothy wrote:

That would seem somewhat unfair if it did not apply to foreign licence holders.

It’s logic like this I do not understand. The unfair thing is to suspend licenses in the first place. The only fair thing in this situation is to allow or not allow foreign aircraft on a permanent basis and be done with it. Just my 2 pennies

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