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Flying over Norway

You need to remain flexible with your routing. The western coast of Norway has poor weather 8 days out of 10. Be ready to fly via Sweden or to cancel entirely. That’s just the way it goes with light GA. I was supposed to be going to Sardinia yesterday but ended up going to Menorca…still having a great time though…

Mainz (EDFZ), Germany
Dear all. I would like to revive this thread. We are planning to take a DA-40 at the end of July on a VFR flight from EHLE to Nordkapp (or as close as we can get to it) flying from EHLE to Gothenburg over Denmark, then going to Bergen, following the coast all the way to Bodo and going back from there through Finland, Estonia, Latvia and Poland.

We plan to have a couple of life jackets with us for all expected water crossings, a reserve radio, some warm clothes, plenty of water and a gas burner just in case.
We have all the required charts and the AIPs for the flight as well as SkyDemon/JeppView etc etc.
Can anyone give us any advise on the minimal survival gear we should have with us? Any tips about landings, places to stay, things to see, real-life JetA1 availability?

Thanks a million!

Most of what you need is in the VFR Guide even if you fly IFR. Jet A1 is available all along the coast, but you must have a Statoil card to fill on most places. The price for Jet A1 varies from place to place, the smaller the airport, the more it cost. Shell is supposed to disappear (taken over completely by Statoil this year, but I don’t know exactly when).

Also check out norskeflyplasser.no for lots of additional smaller airports.

If the weather is nice, be sure to take a trip around a row of island called Lofoten (West and north-west of Bodø). There are several airports there as well, all with Jet A1 I think.

Also be sure to book landing fees and parking in advance. I guess you will be flying mostly at Avinor airfields? in that case there are week charges etc so you can land and park as often as you want on Avinor’s airfields.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

Sweden have national regulations covering flights in the northern parts (mountainous area) regarding what our CAA seem to be appropriate equipment. Remember that you are in very sparsely populated areas, it can seem a bit excessive though, but to survive a few days in the wild I guess it makes sense.

The aircraft should have contrast markings (wings, fuselage, empennage), not less than 2 sqm.
Emergency equipment: signal rockets, signal torch, signaling mirror, flashlight, whistle(?), signaling flag in fluorescent colours
Survival equipment: Knife, saw, axe, immersion suit, storm matches in waterproof casing, storm kitchen, fuel, food, aspirin, anti-mosquito stuff, mosquito net, high visibility clothing.

The high vis/contrast colors are extremely important in a SAR mission, the chances of finding you increases substantially (compared to the regular dark colored jackets and blue jeans).

A flight plan should be sent for all flights, if you don’t have friends/others who can monitor your flight and notify the authorities if you don’t turn up as expected.

In Swedish: http://www.transportstyrelsen.se/publicdocuments/PDF154.pdf (perhaps Google can translate it?)

I hope you’ll have a great flight. I’ve done some flying in the northern parts of Sweden (Luleå, Kiruna, Kebnekaise) and it’s beautiful. This time of year you don’t need NQ either, no matter what time you decide to fly

These rules were introduced some time in the 70s after a light aircraft made an emergency landing in winter. Everyone survived the landing, but they were not appropriately dressed and without any survival equipment. The aircraft was found after several days and by then everyone had frozen to death. If I recall correctly from reading the accident report (a long time ago), they had been desperate enough to attempt to use the ignition system of the engine to start a fire…

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

Another thing that has happened to more than one visitor, with fatal outcome. When the cloads are low (less than 1000 feet) and the visibily is low, some visitors seem to be tempted to fly inland instead of along the coast for some odd reason. Unless you are IFR, don’t. It is better to follow the coast and land at the nearest airport if needed.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway
Emergency equipment: signal rockets, signal torch, signaling mirror, flashlight, whistle(?), signaling flag in fluorescent colours
Survival equipment: Knife, saw, axe, immersion suit, storm matches in waterproof casing, storm kitchen, fuel, food, aspirin, anti-mosquito stuff, mosquito net, high visibility clothing.

I would take a portable radio and portable GPS with me, so you are able to transmit your position. Airliners will hear you on 121.5 and can relay a message.

Are you planning to fly long stretches over water? If so, I would take a life raft as well.
If I am correct, the Pilot Shop at EHLE does rent them out. Ask Peter Mundy here on this forum…

Thanks a lot!

EHLE

Flew to Nordkapp from Rome in a C172N in 2010.

Original plan was to fly up the west coast of Norway but weather was far to variable so routing was Aarhus in Denmark and then Karlstad and Umea in Sweden, Rovaniemi in Finland and arrival at Honnisvag/Nordkapp.

Weather can change quite fast so careful decisions/planning are required.

Can’t remember any specific safety equipment except life jackets. And the whole flight was done without a gps, didn’t have one.

Happy only when flying
Sabaudia airstrip

Most have been covered. Remember that if you fly inland, it´s still wintery in the high mountains, and that t-shirt, shorts and trainers is not smart flying gear when crossing those areas :)

Second LeSvings comment about flying under low ceilings inland. Remember: All terrain in Norway is mountainous in some way, and there are areas in the interior of southern Norway that has few airports/wx reports. If you are not sure to have at least a couple of thousand feet ceiling on your route, stick to the coast.

Se AIBN report: D-EYIL fatal accident

Hokksund/ENHS
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