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Czechia: no more enroute NDBs

As of 7 November 2019, the last three enroute NDBs in the Czech airspace – RAK, HLV and TBV – will disappear from the charts. In the existing SIDs and STARs they will be replaced with RNAV waypoints (EROKA, UPLAV and TIBLA, respectively). The future of the physical beacons themselves has not been announced, so I won’t be surprised it they continue operating unlicensed, similarly to the 422 kHz NDB (UR) at Hradec Kralove LKHK, which gets quite a bit of use as a training navaid.
Approach NDBs still remain in operation at every single IFR airport.

LKBU near Prague, Czech Republic

What to do with those ADFs in the cockpit? Keep them running with a CDI/GPS emulated signal from RNAV points?
(you still need to simulate wing bank dips, wind corrections and thunderstorm inaccuracies to make IR skill tests tough )

Last Edited by Ibra at 16 Sep 15:41
ESSEX, United Kingdom

Ibra wrote:

you still need to simulate wing bank dips, wind corrections and thunderstorm inaccuracies to make IR skill tests tough )

Are NDBs stil part of the IR in EASAland? They’re gone from the FAA tests (and good riddance too!).

Are NDBs stil part of the IR in EASAland?

Yes.

LDZA LDVA, Croatia

Emir wrote:

Are NDBs stil part of the IR in EASAland?
Yes.

NDB procedures are mentioned in the syllabus, but not required for the IR test.
huv
EKRK, Denmark

They have not been required for the test for many years, but you had to “arrange” a test route (and IAPs) which didn’t contain any. This was often a challenge. If there was an NDB in the IAP then you could not refuse to fly it.

In my IRT, I got (at the traditional 6am “this is what we will do” phone briefing from the examiner) EGHI and when I got notams the NDB was INOP

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Enroute NDBs are rare beasts. There’s only a few left in the UK and they are all going, along with many VORs

Darley Moor, Gamston (UK)

What could possibly go wrong….

EKRK, Denmark

The USA has a plan on retaining a Minimum Operational Network (MON) of VORs and localizers, so that you’ll always have one within 100nm in case GNSS goes down. Europe has no such plan and I think that’s a mistake.
Info on MON (it’s also in the AIM): https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ato/service_units/techops/navservices/transition_programs/vormon/

EASA requires a second source of navigation for compliance under part.nco

How is this achieved with no terrestrial aids.

Enstone (EGTN), Oxford (EGTK)
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