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Restricted Airspace for Drones. Oban, Sound of Mull, Coll

boscomantico wrote:

Sure, but that does not necessarily mean 500 feet above the ground or water, as is required by SERA.

I would expect that UK pilots generally keep to 500 feet above ground as it’s not always easy to ensure that there are no people within 500 feet.

Last Edited by Airborne_Again at 13 Jan 13:19
ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

Airborne_Again wrote:

boscomantico wrote: Sure, but that does not necessarily mean 500 feet above the ground or water, as is required by SERA.

I would expect that UK pilots generally keep to 500 feet above ground as it’s not always easy to ensure that there are no people within 500 feet.

Usually higher than 500ft for that reason – if fly over a small hill with people on it, then you are done. :)

EGTR

I would expect that UK pilots generally keep to 500 feet above ground as it’s not always easy to ensure that there are no people within 500 feet.

Sure.

Mainz (EDFZ), Germany

There is an exception for soaring, in the UK you can perfectly legally slope soar (and I have) while being close enough to the fell walkers you can see the whites of their eyes (and give them a cheery wave as you gracefully glide past)

Last Edited by alioth at 13 Jan 15:59
Andreas IOM

alioth wrote:

There is an exception for soaring, in the UK you can perfectly legally slope soar (and I have) while being close enough to the fell walkers you can see the whites of their eyes (and give them a cheery wave as you gracefully glide past)

:) You can probably justify it as it is a takeoff/landing!

EGTR

alioth wrote:

There is an exception for soaring, in the UK you can perfectly legally slope soar (and I have) while being close enough to the fell walkers you can see the whites of their eyes (and give them a cheery wave as you gracefully glide past)

There ‘s been communication recently that this exception doesn’t allow us complete free reign and that we need to make sure that safety of those on the ground is not compromised.

Nympsfield, United Kingdom

Xtophe wrote:

There ‘s been communication recently that this exception doesn’t allow us complete free reign and that we need to make sure that safety of those on the ground is not compromised.

Two years ago I received complaint & picture of me in TMG doing ridge soaring (engine OFF), someone noticed that it was a “yellow aircraft rather than a white glider”, I was told to go somewhere else next time

Still no one could anwser if the exmption applies to TMG with engine running? but I guess it was not worth chasing

I think now even “pure gliders” are asked to do the same…

Last Edited by Ibra at 13 Jan 17:11
ESSEX, United Kingdom

I’ve flown below 600’ over the Sound of Mull with reasonable to good visibility but solid cloud below 1000’. An escape route to Oban or the Great Glen.
There doesn’t appear to be a time limit on restrictions as a NOTAM for a few hours.
The other arm of the route seems to go to Iona.
The reference to Covid-19 is interesting. From the press report the previous drone transport from Oban to Mull was PPE so easily pre-planned by a cheaper transport system.
There is no hospital on Coll. It has a population of 195 (2011 Census) and the GP Practice is open for 1 hour per day, Monday to Friday. There is a short ferry to Tiree. Iona has a much smaller population, and a short ferry to Mull.

Last Edited by Maoraigh at 13 Jan 20:20
Maoraigh
EGPE, United Kingdom

StampeSV4 mentioned: "highest vertical limit is 950feet "
I can’t find any height mentioned in the published documents linked on the CAA site.
Access to non-commercial aviation is not mentioned to be available. With the CAA Infringement policy a 1500 cloudbase could shut the Great Glen route down.
The timescale is confusing – multi month trials are mentioned, although 4 weeks is sought.
PS It’s the UK Space Agency, not English. Space, like Airspace, is not devolved.

Maoraigh
EGPE, United Kingdom
EIKH Kilrush
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