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FAA 61.75 piggyback + FAA IR ?

Ibra wrote:

If you want lot of fun, how about this: how come you could fly on FAA61.75 based on EASA PPL using FAA medical without holding an EASA medical?

The true question is not “how come” but rather “where and in which plane” …

Germany

Ibra wrote:

In any case, as Peter said there is a specific exam to add FAA IR to a 61.75, it’s called “foreign pilot exam”, so the route is still “open”

Just to be clear, there are two ways for an IR to be included in a restricted (foreign-based) US private pilot certificate. If the foreign licence includes an IR, then these privileges can be included in the US certificate by passing the FAA Instrument Rating Foreign Pilot knowledge test, code IFP. The restricted pilot certificate would need to be reissued by following the process described at https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/airmen_certification/foreign_license_verification/

The second method is to obtain a standard US IR by meeting the US training and testing requirements. Such a standard IR will be included in a restricted pilot certificate with the annotation “U.S. Test Passed,” as set out in FSIMS, vol 5, ch 2, sec 14. Note that the Instrument Rating Airplane test, code IRA, is required in this case. The IFP knowledge test is not valid for a standard US IR.

A standard US IR can be carried over to a standard US pilot certificate, in the event that you make use of the EU–US conversion agreement to convert the EU PPL to a US private. The conversion requires passing a 40-question Private Pilot Airplane EU Part-FCL Conversion knowledge test, code PEP, completing a US flight review, and holding a US medical certificate.

Without prejudice to rights under the Chicago Convention, if the aircraft comes within the scope of the EASA Basic Regulation(s)—such as a third-country non-annex I aircraft when flown in the EASA member states and operated by an aircraft operator who is resident or established there—then an EASA BIR/IR will be required by any pilot when flying under the IFR. A standard US IR can be converted to an EU IR under the EU–US conversion agreement. Alternatively, with sufficient PIC experience under IFR, you could seek an EASA BIR or IR using the credits in FCL.835 or Part-FCL appendix 6 section Aa.

London

Many thanks for all the very interesting contributions.
To clarify my personal situation, although my plane is based in Italy, I am neither resident in Italy nor in any european country. So I suppose I can fly my N airplane with an FAA licence, even if it is based on my EASA licence.
If I understand correctly, I could sit for the IRA written in the USA then get a checkride to add the IR rating to my (EASA based ) FAA certificate and legally fly IFR in europe?

LIAP, Italy

I am neither resident in Italy nor in any european country. So I suppose I can fly my N airplane with an FAA licence, even if it is based on my EASA licence.

Yes.

The “resident” bit was never defined, for the EU or the UK…

I could sit for the IRA written in the USA then get a checkride to add the IR rating to my (EASA based ) FAA certificate

For a standalone FAA IR you need more than just the FAA IR checkride. You need to meet the Part 61 training requirements. The possession of the “FAA foreign pilot IR” doesn’t help, AFAIK. However, the FAA accepts non US training (with non US certified instructors, too) towards all US certificates, subject to, IIRC, just the last few hours before the checkride.

Some notes here.

legally fly IFR in europe?

If you are not Europe resident, and are prepared to support/argue that legally (like I say, the regs are drafted to be FUD; there are no definitions and there is no known enforcement, and anyway Italy has derogated on it) then you can fly in Europe on just FAA papers.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Ciao Aquila,

just note that where you have (or don’t have) your “residence” is not excatly the decisive point. So even if you don’t have an Italian “residenza”, it could still be argued that this regulation still applies to you. The wording in the basic regulation is:

We know this is fuzzy, and can be interpreted in different ways. However, if there is any chance that you might be amongst these cases (see the commas and "or"s), then you should get an EASA license/IR.

Last Edited by boscomantico at 26 Jan 15:04
Mainz (EDFZ), Germany

Peter wrote:

the FAA accepts non US training

Actually, I am considering sitting for the IRA and get an accelerated IR training in the USA this summer. I am not sure if it is realistic to get an IR rating in 10 days, but I am sure I will learn a lot anyway.

boscomantico wrote:

even if you don’t have an Italian residenza

I know that the concept of residency can lead to many interpretations and that my status could become an issue.
I flew to boscomantico twice last summer. You are from Verona ?

LIAP, Italy

No, but I spent six wonderful years there, plus a couple more years in other parts of Italy.

Mainz (EDFZ), Germany

aquila wrote:

I am not sure if it is realistic to get an IR rating in 10 days, but I am sure I will learn a lot anyway.

It is. Been there, done it, got the piece of paper, still waiting for the piece of plastic.

tmo
EPKP - Kraków, Poland

tmo wrote:

Been there, done it

Thank you! would you mind sharing which school you attended ? I am considering IFR6 (which is actually 6 days, not even 10!)

LIAP, Italy

Discussion of residency etc for the purpose of the EU or UK anti N-reg regs have been moved to the existing thread

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom
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