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CAA to Slash Red Tape for GA

Great if it results in anything.

http://ukga.com/news/view?contentId=31977

Spending too long online
EGTF Fairoaks, EGLL Heathrow, United Kingdom

Indeed, I did wonder what happened to the red tape challenge. I see Mr Shapps at EGLG sometimes, but I don’t really know him well, and never had the chance to ask about this. I saw from the link this part “creating an independent Challenge Panel, including GA industry experts and professionals.”

Sounds good, but I wonder who the ‘industry experts’ will be. Often it seems to be someone from PPL/IR which is fine as there are some powerful figures there representing that part of UK GA well, but maybe they could cast their net wider and include a few figures from this forum onto their panel should they wish to.

> The government and the CAA have announced plans to strip away unnecessary bureaucracy for the UK general aviation sector. One of the key changes will be the setting up by April 2014 of a new GA Unit within the CAA dedicated to more proportionate, effective regulation that supports and encourages a dynamic GA sector for the UK

Meanwhile, the newly renamed Personal Licences and Training Dept is out touring the country to explain to existing RFs the new bureaucracy that will be applied to them from April 2015 and the associated costs should they wish to stay in business

Looks like they have shot themselves in both feet before they have begun

> “creating an independent Challenge Panel, including GA industry experts and professionals.”

sounds like SACP all over again; Hazbeenz and Neverwazez

I think this (local copy) is a report from the above.

Interesting reading.

Page 14 shows a much smaller drop in GA activity than many would have us believe.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

I also note that one of the recommendations is to do away with the requirement to notify PC Plod for CTA flights to the CI, IOM, NI and Eire. This would be hugely welcome and I hope it comes to pass, but I’m not holding my breath!

Andreas IOM

I wonder how what is now no more than a regional office of EASA can have any effect whatsoever on the rubbish the is produced by the Cologne unnessesary paperwork and regulation factory ( after all paperwork we pay for is job security for those in EASA).

There are no prizes for guessing my vote in the recent European elections !

Well you could look at page 31 of the report for a list of some positive effects that CAA efforts have already achieved.

The CAA is one of the biggest and most influential NAAs within EASA. As it becomes easier to shop around for regulation, NAAs have the possibility to have a significant impact on regulatory implementation in other countries. I am cautiously optimistic that this will drive some positive movement even before EASA start to roll back on their approach to regulation of GA, as they inevitably will have to do.

EGBJ / Gloucestershire

The CAA is one of the biggest and most influential NAAs within EASA. As it becomes easier to shop around for regulation, NAAs have the possibility to have a significant impact on regulatory implementation in other countries.

The German CAA are happy about every German aircraft owner moving to the UK CAA. They only see upsides to it. Less work, same pay and the ones doing it, usually are the more involved, vocal types that they like to get rid of anyhow.

It is very hard to explain the terms “competition” or “choice” to a government employee over here.

Last Edited by achimha at 31 May 07:16

The German CAA are happy about every German aircraft owner moving to the UK CAA

What is the impact of that? Germany would have a lot of based aircraft which it will have no control of maintenance regulation. I know that there is European harmonisation, but that isn’t working because otherwise people would not be moving registers. I see interesting times ahead on that one, because the UK would become stronger in the GA community, how would that go down with the rest of Europe?

Well if the CAA become more GA-friendly than other NAAs, and attract additional aircraft onto the G register as a result, who cares what the rest of Europe (i.e. the NAAs) thinks? As Achim says, they still have comfortable jobs. Pilot owners across Europe get better regulation, and the CAA earn a bit more income. Everyone wins!

EGBJ / Gloucestershire
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