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ICAO / FAA PPL to EASA PPL

Not being critical

Why not? There’s plenty to be critical about. Just look at this little gem.

Last Edited by 172driver at 02 Sep 15:31

Once upon a time they didn’t tell you the QNH if it was in the ATIS. Then they started doing so. I guess there had been “incidents”. It’s not a UK thing, BTW. Exactly the same in Sweden.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

What is the point of a rigorous practical R/T test? Surely the practical flight test is the place to assess R/T work?

And then if you listen to London Information on a nice day we don’t even do it very well after all of that.

There is your answer.

In the UK in the 1980s we ran two systems, the RT Test and Practical Assessment during PPL training. Two quite different standards emerged, the practical assessment failed to deliver a satisfactory standard, so the practical test became mandatory again. It is actually quite simple if you know the correct calls, many of which you seldom get the chance to make during a training flight or skill test.

The fundamental problem is a lack of training; and little standardisation between different ATC Units

It is actually quite simple if you know the correct calls, many of which you seldom get the chance to make during a training flight or skill test.

I agree but how many people actually remember anything from the R/T exam after having gone through a subsequent full training process and exam?

EGTK Oxford

I didn’t have to do the RT exam, got transferred from my ICAO license onto my EASA license. Lucky me!

If you listen to the average Joe PPL’s radio use, you’d better start crying.

Very much overrated, this radio exam, for someone who already has a radio exam on his/her ICAO license.

Just bureaucrats covering their backsides.

Last Edited by Archie at 22 Sep 11:38

I have been trying to convert my FAA PPL to an EASA PPL in Belgium. I have passed the written exams, language proficiency, medical, the hour requirement, and had practical training. The only thing left is the practical exam. However, the Belgian CAA has now announced they stopped any conversions:

https://mobilit.belgium.be/nl/luchtvaart/vergunningen/piloten/door_derde_landen_afgegeven_icao_vergunningen

My questions:

What country do you recommend for a conversion from FAA PPL to EASA PPL? Would all the forms and exams be in English? Any particular flight school?

Regarding the last question, preferably a for-profit business please, instead of a non-profit club. My experience with the current non-profit club in Belgium is dismal, most of the instructors are disinterested, and this led to a partial waste of time and money from me.

KSRQ, United States

The UK should be well used to doing these conversions. One problem may be that the EASA PPL exams you have passed may be country-specific.

@Dan_B – post moved to existing thread.

From that Belgian page:

ICAO licenses issued by third countries
As from 1st January 2020, the Licensing directorate of Belgian Civil Aviation Authority will no longer convert ICAO license to Part-FCL license and will no longer accept a valid class or type rating issued by a third country for inserting it in a Part-FCL license . If you wish to convert a license or rating issued by a third country, we invite you to transfer your license to another competent authority.

Isn’t Belgium acting contrary to EASA FCL? EASA has a defined route for this.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

@Peter: I was assuming that the upcoming Brexit is already placing constraints on converting an FAA PPL into an EASA PPL via UK. If not, this might be indeed a good route.

Belgian CAA’s decision to stop all conversions seems indeed against EASA and the ICAO agreement. I fail to see the point of it. I will inform FAA about this breach of mutuality too.

KSRQ, United States

I was assuming that the upcoming Brexit is already placing constraints on converting an FAA PPL into an EASA PPL via UK

Yes, this may be an issue. Much depends on what happens in the transition period, which is likely to be all of 2020.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

Isn’t Belgium acting contrary to EASA FCL? EASA has a defined route for this.

No. Belgium is acting as permitted by the Aircrew Regulation, article 8(1):

Without prejudice to […], Member States may accept third country licences, ratings or certificates, and associated medical certificates issued by or on behalf of third countries, in accordance with the provisions of Annex III to this Regulation.

London
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