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EASA Basic IR (BIR) (merged)

Thanks for the info.

BTW I did a google on AOM but it turned up nothing

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

BTW I did a google on AOM but it turned up nothing

Aerodrome Operating Minima?

https://www.skybrary.aero/index.php/Aerodrome_Operating_Minima_(AOM)

EGTR

OK; thanks. However

policing AOM is not ATC’s job

is not always true, strictly speaking. For example, ATC will not let you depart if the cloudbase is below the aerodrome minimum VFR departure figure.

I can see that they are unlikely to be policing BIR privileges as compared to IR privileges…

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

The VFR departure figure has nothing to do with take off for an IFR flight. It only has a place in what you intend to do in case of a problem after take off. EG Do you require a take off alternative? At what flying time can this be from the departure airfield etc? It is for the pilot to decide not ATC
If however RVR is below take off minimal it will be for ATC to decide whether or not to declare that LVP are in use at the airport. Often this happens at.below the 400m RVR.

France

I can’t keep track of all this but I thought that below 400m RVR no private IR holder can depart anyway, in EASA-land, as things are today.

The above is a hard reg only when there is RVR reporting i.e. measuring equipment. It sounds like for the BIR you don’t get this get-out, so if the man in the tower says the vis is 1400m you cannot go.

I’ve done some ~200m departures years ago and they are “interesting”. Basically the picture in front remains the same while the airspeed increases and when it gets to about 70kt one pulls the yoke back and after a few seconds everything vanishes If you don’t immediately transition to the AI, or if the AI fails, you have a big problem.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

BTW I did a google on AOM but it turned up nothing

Sorry, I’ve spent too much time on the RMT doing the NPA for the IFR AWO NCO stuff to remember that “AOM” might not be an obvious TLA. :)

I can’t keep track of all this but I thought that below 400m RVR no private IR holder can depart anyway, in EASA-land, as things are today.

It’s allowed in principle with a specific approval under SPA.LVO, but to the best of my knowledge there is no private NCO operator who has obtained one.

gallois wrote:

If however RVR is below take off minimal it will be for ATC to decide whether or not to declare that LVP are in use at the airport. Often this happens at.below the 400m RVR.

I would hope it happens at a higher RVR than that. LVP are a precondition for low visibility operations (landing < 550, t/o < 400 RVR). Looking at EGMC, for example, LVPs are put in place with vis < 2000 m or ceiling < 300 ft.

Have we given up trying to stop acronyms in posts? Some are universal but others, such as we are seeing above, will likely be understood by very few so the post will be brushed aside by most.

UK, United Kingdom

bookworm wrote:

Ceiling is defined in Part-SERA (though it is used extensively in the Air Ops regulation):

‘ceiling’ means the height above the ground or water of the base of the lowest layer of cloud below 6 000 m (20 000 ft) covering more than half the sky

In other words, the lowest BKN or OVC layer. For anyone who finds that would have a serious impact on their operations, I would suggest an IR rather than a BIR.

I believe FAA has essentially the same definition, although phrased differently.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

Low visibility operations are announced when the RVR is less than 400m, as far as I recall the ceiling plays no role.
If LVO are put in place take off can occur providing the RVR is greater than 150m.
If no RVR is available or of the pilot so chooses s/he can use a VIBAL ie the pilot claims to be able to see 6 runway markers. No LVO’s.can take place without RVR as far as I remember.
And no ceiling needs to be taken into account.
Landing single pilot one needs a visibility of 800 metres except if you have a suitable coupled autopilot in which case 550m RVR is allowed.
The 200 ft minima is the minimal, unless otherwise set out on the instrument approach charts for the individual airport for an approach with horizontal and vertical guidance.
Again no ceiling needs to be taken into account to begin the approach, only visibility.
Of course in the planning stage you will take it into account the ceiling and the add ons to decide on whether or not you need alternates and how many. There is a difference between what needs to take place in the planning stage and what is necessary once in the air.
No add ons are necessary to the minima for an ILS approach or for others with vertical guidance like LVP’s. They are also unnecessary for a CDFA otherwise such as dive a d drive require MDA +20ft.
I do not know the regulations for the IMC(r) or for N reg pilots who in Europe must fly using the most penalizing regs between the FAA regs and EASA regs. IE if minima for an FAA licenced pilot are higher than those for an EASA reg pilot then the pilot of the N reg if on an FAA licence, must work to the higher minima.
At least I think that’s how I remember the conversation with the examiner before my last check ride.

France

Is there a real-life simplification of the practical training towards BIR instead of CBIR? In a nutshell, the key difference seems the higher decision altitude, will the training be much lighter/easier then? Maybe in light of VMC-requirements for the approach?
Also with regard to the BIR-theory training, I guess it basically is the CBIR-theory broken into three separate exams?

Apologies if this was covered already, in that case I have overseen that…

Switzerland
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