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Airplane accident close San Sebastián - G-OARI

There’s some big hills down there. Best guess is the crash site is about 40nm SW of LFBZ.

Fly safely
Various UK. Operate throughout Europe and Middle East, United Kingdom

172driver wrote:

Spain I have never, ever, been refused CAS entry or transit.

Same, although many less trips and on the France → Portugal corridor.
Had to switch from IFR → VFR on a couple occasions to route direct (through CAS) though.

Making them understand I wanted to do the 22 approach with visual maneouvre to 04 (when heading about 200 to the airport) was a bit more difficult to do. My colleague a couple min behind tried the same a bit after ATC said “OK” to me, and then just said “I just want to do what my colleague is doing”

Sad news, one of the victims seems (following him on twitter) to be one of the skilled pilots I come across in the south-east…

Last Edited by Ibra at 10 Jan 17:27
ESSEX, United Kingdom

Noe wrote:

Making them understand I wanted to do the 22 approach with visual maneouvre to 04
Call it circling and they might understand better.

ESMK, Sweden

I think I used circle to land first


It’s a picture taken in this area, flying back from Portugal. We encountered the highest terrain and lowest cloud base a little before and it got a little tense with the passengers (thence no pictures to show you).
I remembered checking windy cloudbase forecast the entire day of the flight. We went through around 4 pm, clouds were lower until then and got lower afterwards.
Definitely serious terrain here.
On a trip, the flight back home is the more dangerous because you have to make it at a precise place (your base) and time (before work resumes).

Having read this thread I feel it is worth saying that if you find yourself in IMC and there is any doubt about terrain clearance, you declare an emergency, and climb, period. There will almsot certainly be no one else down there in the unlikely event your radio call is not heard. I cant think why you would do anything else because whilst it may be hard to fly on instruments, avoiding terrain scud running is likely to require even more skill.

If it is a choice between IMC and ice, then you have a really tough decision; I am not sure there is an easy answer. A lot will depend on how much you know about the cloud tops, the type of cloud and freezing levels.

Fuji_Abound wrote:

Having read this thread I feel it is worth saying that if you find yourself in IMC and there is any doubt about terrain clearance, you declare an emergency, and climb, period. There will almsot certainly be no one else down there in the unlikely event your radio call is not heard. I cant think why you would do anything else because whilst it may be hard to fly on instruments, avoiding terrain scud running is likely to require even more skill.

Not sure, but probably an advice that applies even to “VFR only pilot/aircraft” even those who had just 30 min under the hood or not instrument equipped, the other alternative is to pull a “forced landing” but on the above picture not sure there is a suitable field?

Fuji_Abound wrote:

If it is a choice between IMC and ice, then you have a really tough decision; I am not sure there is an easy answer. A lot will depend on how much you know about the cloud tops, the type of cloud and freezing levels.

On IMC under icing & terrain, I don’t think having additional live data will do any help, this means fly at MSA and accept the risk of icing…

If icing exhibit so much sensitivity to 1000ft/500ft change in height (compared to terrain clearance), then you should not be flying that day: one does not disintegrate in pieces by flying into ice just above MSA, however hitting a hill is a different matter

Last Edited by Ibra at 11 Jan 21:46
ESSEX, United Kingdom

Ibra, ignoring for a moment whether or not you should be flying (because usually you shouldnt have been) the problem with climbing, with no information, is you just dont know. You dont know if there is 5,000 feet of solid cloud above, and you may already be vfr in freezing air. In may be the only pragmatic call, but you are potentially between devil and deep blue.

I know it well, early days got caught out between eire and uk, thought i know, will climb on top, i eventually found the tops at 8,500, and fortunately with good vmc above. Fortunately it was a twin and i was deiced, but i doubt i would have survived the climb without deice. It was the answer to get away from some uncomfortable scud running for sure, but either outcome could have been different in a different aircraft or if i had not climbed.

In this case there’s actually a rather simple solution (ok, written with hindsight in the comfort of home, I hasten to add): turn left and go out over the sea and let down there.

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