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Corona / Covid-19 virus - airport and flying restrictions, and licensing / medical issues

FAA being pressed for another general extension. No evidence that extending medicals had any negative effect (not surprising).

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

All people arriving by plane in Switzerland now need to have a PCR test. From any country. This rule does not apply if you enter on foot, by car, bus or train.

So if I fly out of the country, I need to do a PCR test before leaving in order to be readmitted a few hours later.

Apart from the hassle, cost and time that it costs to frequently get tested, I’m also not keen on going to some test center, where all the people that think they may be infected go to get a test, and sit there for hours breathing their viruses.

I’m not amused about this senseless rule discriminating only one mode of transportation.

Last Edited by Rwy20 at 08 Feb 12:32

Is that even if you do not land abroad?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Rwy20 wrote:

Apart from the hassle, cost and time that it costs to frequently get tested, I’m also not keen on going to some test center, where all the people that think they may be infected go to get a test, and sit there for hours breathing their viruses.

Apart, they are not really fun… like someone drilling into your brains.

Rwy20 wrote:

I’m not amused about this senseless rule discriminating only one mode of transportation

The correct new order reads as follows:

- Everyone entering Switzerland needs to fill in an electronic document prior to arrival. Exemption if you enter by car, bicycle or on foot and you have not visited a risk country in the last 10 days prior. (so also per train and bus).
- Anyone wishing to board a flight destination Switzerland must present a valid negative PCR test at check in or be refused transport.
- Additional to the test, anyone arriving in Switzerland from a risk country as per list, needs to observe 10 days of quarantine. If you do another test after 7 days, you may break quarantine thereafter if the new test was negative. If you enter from a risk country or area, you will need a test regardless of the means of transport.
- Anyone entering from another country not on the risk list needs to observe 7 days of quarantine.

I think quite a few countries had that before us, Austria for instance. Either PCR test or 14 days quarantine. Also Germany I think had PCR tests at the airport for quite a while. But if they require it, they should offer it on arrival like other countries do it.

I guess you are right however in as so far as many measures are quite complex, arbitrary and no longer understood by the population. That is what half baked things achieve.

The gist of it is: Don’t travel unless you absolutely have to. And the moniker “STFAH” from spring still is very much a variant to forego all these unpleasant things.

Last Edited by Mooney_Driver at 08 Feb 16:19
LSZH, Switzerland

Worth noting that the UK has the 5 day early release quarantine option. This was talked about for months and now it is there, but it may have been available for some time and the press just didn’t pick it up.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

Is that even if you do not land abroad?

No, this is the relevant part of the ordinance:

The following individuals must provide evidence that they have been tested for Sars-CoV-2 by molecular biology analysis within the last 72 hours and the result of the test was negative:
a. Persons who enter Switzerland and have stayed at any time within 10 days prior to entry in a state or territory with an increased risk of infection;
b. Persons who enter Switzerland by air from a state or territory with no increased risk of infection.

So I guess if you have gone to pay your landing fee somewhere abroad, you fall under this rule, but if you don’t land then you don’t.

Last Edited by Rwy20 at 08 Feb 18:44

This may be relevant – the AZ vaccine is not yet FAA approved.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Probably one of the busiest February flying days we‘ve ever had in Germany.

Mainz (EDFZ), Germany

Flying is not illegal here but since some stupid person(s) demanded “guidance” from the CAA, they predictably got it, and the DfT says you can’t do A to B and can do only engine health flights. It is all guidance though. I am not aware of an exhaustive (legally binding) list of permitted reasons for leaving the house.

It appears that the bit which makes it “not advisable” to fly A to B is the current “essential travel only” guidance, and according to the timetable they published yesterday it sounds like that might disappear around 12 April, when they will “allow” family holidays in the UK:

They don’t actually say this but obviously you can’t have “essential travel only” and still allow family holidays.

That should also enable travelling abroad, although you will have the quarantine stuff to return back to.

It is all just “guidance” though – except for the quarantine.

However, this bit must also remove the “essential travel” guidance, and should make it possible to do a fly-in within the UK:

Reportedly people are booking lots of holidays abroad for June onwards

But we don’t know the quarantine/testing regime then. There will have to be something, because many younger people go on holiday for “heavy close-up social stuff” and, like summer 2020, they will bring back a lot of virus, and any new strains. So I reckon there will be mandatory testing on return, with the test done before embarking on the return flight (because once people arrive here, you can’t keep track of where they go, unless you do the horrible “hotel quarantine” thing). So for a day trip to France you would do the test back home.

I see firms advertising the cheap tests under £10, for the corporate market.

The UK is moving very slowly, considering the vast numbers being vaccinated. 17.7M so far.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

In fairness, they should move slowly. Essentially they want the vaccine to virtually eliminate the virus domestically. Keep the R value below 1 by having sufficient vaccinated people, and that will eventually eliminate it.

But there are unknown factors still, that could lead to that being more difficult.
- New strains that are more infectious, or which the vaccine is less effective.
- People’s behaviour changing so much that the R number would have been brought up to 4 or 5, and the vaccines only mitigates that down to 1 (because they aren’t 100% effective at preventing infection).
- Lots of people refusing to take the vaccine later in the roll out as the age profile gets lower and the numbers of infections goes down.

I think this is one thing where it’s better to under promise and over deliver to allow to capacity to deal with infections not coming down as expected.

EIKH Kilrush
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