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Process of purchasing an aircraft located in another EU country

Not telling, sorry The new owner might be alerted and cause trouble.

My point is that EASA to EASA registry transfer is not always trivial. It is probably true that there is no physical inspection, but the accepting “CAA” is entitled to check the paperwork (all of it, including all mods) carefully.

Of course now somebody will jump on me for posting something I can’t support

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

My point is that EASA to EASA registry transfer is not always trivial.

I think one of the beauties of owning EASA airplanes these days ist that it is mostly not even necessary to do the change. The only reason I can think of is if you are registered in a state which has rather expensive and gold plated bureaucracy involved with ownership. Otherwise?

LSZH, Switzerland

My point is that EASA to EASA registry transfer is not always trivial.

You mean buying used planes with dodgy paperwork isn’t always trivial.

Compared to how it used to be with national aviation rules (and how it is now again with UK), an EASA to EASA transfer is in fact quite trivial.

Airline/Mentor/Safety/Instructor - Pilot
Based Austria | Operating Worldwide

Mooney_Driver wrote:

Otherwise?

Some countries do not allow planes to be registered when the operator has no place of residence, address or business there.

Airline/Mentor/Safety/Instructor - Pilot
Based Austria | Operating Worldwide

Snoopy wrote:

You mean buying used planes with dodgy paperwork isn’t always trivial.

Compared to how it used to be with national aviation rules (and how it is now again with UK), an EASA to EASA transfer is in fact quite trivial.

Spot on. I have just transferred an aircraft from OY- to F- and it was pretty straightforward. Both aviation authorities were equally efficient, no physical inspection was necessary, just photos with the new registration marks. The aircraft had a valid ARC and the French CAMO (which has been maintaining the aircraft) helped with the application, all done over email. Denmark has specific rules where only residents, owners with ties to Denmark, or using a Danish CAMO can keep OY- reg, hence the move to F-, but in most cases it is actually not even necessary to change the registration country, you can perfectly well have an aircraft maintained / owned in an other EASA country.

Last Edited by podair at 15 May 13:28
ORTAC

Mooney_Driver wrote:

Otherwise?
Some countries demand private planes permanently located/used in the country to be registered there.
ESMK, Sweden

Arne wrote:

Some countries demand private planes permanently located/used in the country to be registered there.

Source (legal)?

Airline/Mentor/Safety/Instructor - Pilot
Based Austria | Operating Worldwide

Norway and Denmark ban N-reg.
France bans non-F-reg Annex 1 (many variations of that one around Europe, e.g. UK did the same)
Most of the 3rd world demands local-reg only (can be delayed by bribery but the bribes get bigger and eventually you get the message).
Then you have “incentives” like Greece charging ~5x more for landing a foreign reg than an SX-reg.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

A legal source confirming non OY- EASA reg aircraft can’t be based in DK, preferably a link to a danish government entity would be nice.

For N-reg (prohibit basing) I believe it would even be covered under intl. law.

Is it legal to base a non N-reg aircraft indefinitely in the USA?

Airline/Mentor/Safety/Instructor - Pilot
Based Austria | Operating Worldwide

Snoopy wrote:

Is it legal to base a non N-reg aircraft indefinitely in the USA?

Yes, I understand indefinitely, 14 CFR 91.711 Special Rules for Foreign Civil Aircraft puts no time limits on it. Within the US it can be flown on an FAA pilot certificate as far the FAA is concerned, per 14 CFR 61.3(b)

Obviously almost nobody has ever been motivated to do it with an EU registered plane and therefore virtually nobody thinks about the legalities involved. I did know a guy who kept a Danish registered plane operational in the US for some years, he had no issues except for inspections. Canadian and Mexican registered planes near the respective borders would probably be the more common examples.

Last Edited by Silvaire at 19 May 19:29
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