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2014 aircraft shipments

here

Mooney sold 1
Cessna sold 0 (zero) of the 182, but 22 of the C400 which is interesting

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

I wonder what the Chinese Mooney investors think, now … I sure hope this changes in 2015

I think the 182 figures are because they had planned to change over to diesel power but had a couple of issues.

Darley Moor, Gamston (UK)

Cessna sold 0 (zero) of the 182 – isn’t that because the 182 isn’t in production pending introduction of the diesel engine?

Mooney was effectively in bankruptcy until mid-2014 – not likely to sell much of anything.

Last Edited by Shorrick_Mk2 at 13 Feb 12:42

Cessna sold 0 (zero) of the 182 – isn’t that because the 182 isn’t in production pending introduction of the diesel engine?

Only the T182T, the NA 182 remains unchanged.

I wonder what the Chinese Mooney investors think, now … I sure hope this changes in 2015

They might be able to issue a press release in a year from now announcing 100% growth

I’m also mildly puzzled by the inclusion of stuff like UH-60 Blackhawks in a “General Aviation Aircraft” report.

What I find highly interesting here is that in GA the more expensive airplanes seem to sell better. More sold SR22T than SR20/SR22 or more Barons than Bonanzas. Same for turboprops and jets. This tells me that buyers for a new GA aircraft seem to be so wealthy that they pretty much don’t care to pay 200.000+ for a better version of the airplane they desire to buy. On the other hand I question why those low-end / mid-range planes are still in production when they don’t sell, but are still too expensive for regular folks. I guess this sector is pretty much only for flight-school.

All true. To be honest, that

in GA the more expensive airplanes seem to sell better

we have been seeing for over ten years now. The SR20 is almost dead. The savings in the production process of an SR20 over a (so much more capable) SR22 are just too small. Therefore, the price difference is too small. Cessna never restarted the 152 because they figured it would cost almost the same to build than the 172. Etc.

What is selling reasonably well is SR22Ts and the Piper M-Class. High end personal aircraft being bought often by people stepping down from big twins, with no step-back in performance. That market still exists to a certain degree. But “middle-class” four seat? No. The only exception is the 172 which are going to flying schools as two-seat trainers with “advanced” avionics. The Tecnam P2010 and the Flight Design C4 will have a really hard time no matter what.

Funny you mention the Baron, which still sells in modest numbers. That one puzzles me indeed.
After all, it

  • is very expensive
  • still uses Avgas (a lot of it)
  • is cramped inside
  • is non-turbo (and even if you put these on after-market, it is still unpressurized)

It probably works because it is the only of its class out there. Cessna and Piper have abandoned the “big twin niche” in the mid-eighties. But hey, we are talking 40 aircraft here, which is just marginally more then zero.

Last Edited by boscomantico at 13 Feb 19:52
Mainz (EDFZ), Germany

The Baron is indeed strange. Must be some government customer or so. Can’t image private individuals buying these aircraft.

Well, the market of used planes in the category of said expensive planes is much smaller than that of the lower end with many very good Mooneys, C210, C182, down to the MS880 for a tiny fraction of the cost of a new plane. But I think once you decide to spend well north of 300k on an aircraft, you might finance it anyway and just adjust the flight cost for what you can afford? I am honest, I have no clue hoe to afford a Meridian or TBM700, unless having a big pile of cash floating around. (But then again, I’m happy with my LTTK-aircraft).

Last Edited by mh at 13 Feb 19:46
mh
Aufwind GmbH
EKPB, Germany
24 Posts
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