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Channel Islands / Isle of Man / San Marino aircraft registry / register (merged)

Well, if an EASA state issues a validation, that obviates the need for that pilot to have an EASA certificate. To fly aan IOM aircraft you need either an IOM licence or a validation. Validations are for a pilot not an aircraft. The registry doesn’t know who a pilot flies for. The European rules apply to an operator not the pilot.

Last Edited by JasonC at 23 May 17:33
EGTK Oxford

That is incorrect

Spain

Hurricane wrote:

That is incorrect

That is not particularly informative. Which bit?

EGTK Oxford

Which bits ? Ok then. Let’s make it particularly informative.
Have you seen a registry validation ?
The aircraft registration is printed on it, it is written that the pilot has permission to fly a specific aircraft registration.

A registry isn’t an EASA state and doesn’t negate the requirement for that pilot to have an EASA licence, something which they are quite aware of. But they still issue validations for EU aircraft and pilots even though they are fully aware of this. Other pilots have had to pay for EASA training and licences such as some other posters on this forum to remain legal, why did they bother if registries still allow the above practice ?!

There is no such thing as an IOM licence or other registry licence, they are validations from all registries. If one looks closely enough though these validations are possibly sometimes being unofficially utilised as a 3 year licence and presented to SAFA and other official entities as such, which shouldn’t be the case.

Registries know exactly who a pilot flies for, why wouldn’t they ??! The aircraft registration is printed on a validation and the registry issues all other aircraft paperwork for that registration and company.

The European rules apply very much to the pilot, I would suggest that you read them again or some of the updated information releases from NAA’s Operator location doesn’t absolve the pilot now of requiring an EASA licence and associated EASA current type ratings if aircraft and pilot are based in Europe. Also some NAA releases now include the EASA licence requirement for operators based outside of the EU but with aircraft and pilots based in the EU, maybe one close to you ?

Last Edited by Hurricane at 24 May 07:33
Spain

I’m totally confused by this discussion. I must confess I don’t understand what Hurricane’s point is.

My understanding of license validation is that it means that a state of registry permits the holder of a foreign license to act as flight crew member of aircraft registered to that state, under conditions determined by the same state.

E.g. Sweden can validate a non-EASA PPL if the national authority considers the requirements for the foreign PPL equivalent to Swedish (EASA) requirements. The conditions are that the validation is restricted to a maximum of 12 months, is valid for day VFR only, that relevant class/type ratings associated with the foreign license are valid and that the foreign medical certificate is valid. In other words, the holder of e.g. a US PPL can get a Swedish validation and can then fly SE-reg aircraft VFR by day for 12 months.

Hurricane seems to imply that this there is something wrong with this procedure, but I don’t understand what.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

There is some confusion on the point about the aircraft reg being on the validation.

When I applied to San Marino, the application definitely required me to nominate the particular aircraft registration.

But now I look at the Certification of Validation it just says “aircraft registered in the Republic of San Marino”.

EGKB Biggin Hill

Your taking about a validation issued by Swedish authorities to be used for an aircraft based in Sweden. Totally different scenario and further it’s not one that is registration specific either.

Virtually 99% of certain registry aircraft are not based in that registry state and instead are utilised on that register in a European or other country. The discussion is that inside of Europe local rules need complying with such as the requirement to hold an EASA licence and associated type ratings. If this isn’t complied with, which it isn’t in some cases then that validation isn’t worth much at all.

Spain

Timothy that might be the case for San Marino but not all registries are the same, some do write the registration on the validation document too.

Spain

Hurricane wrote:

The European rules apply very much to the pilot, I would suggest that you read them again or some of the updated information releases from NAA’s Operator location doesn’t absolve the pilot now of requiring an EASA licence and associated EASA current type ratings if aircraft and pilot are based in Europe. Also some NAA releases now include the EASA licence requirement for operators based outside of the EU but with aircraft and pilots based in the EU, maybe one close to you ?

The European rules (if you exclude the odd UK construction) require pilots to hold the EASA certificates if the operator is based in the EU. I am not sure why you are being so aggressive around the subject.

Are you perhaps affected in a business sense by people not having EASA papers?

EGTK Oxford

I can’t understand why you are being accusatory of aggression when you wrote than you wanted me to be more particularly informative in my post, so I informed you. You seem well aware that the operator regulations are not as clear cut in some countries, and there is more than one.

The operator based in the EU statement doesn’t absolve anyone of having an EASA licence even if you base the operator outside of the EU, with aircraft and pilots based in the EU.

Spain
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