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Glass cockpit aircraft more likely to have accidents which are fatal?

Flyer59 wrote:

But the main features, necessary for VFR, are so simple I can teach them to anybody in 5 minutes.

Maybe so, but EFIS require a rating nowadays, which is equally insane because they are all different. To use an EFIS efficiently you have to learn the architecture of it, at least with the G1000. The concept of having to learn an obscure and opaque software architecture to use what otherwise is dead simple and intuitive is madness.

Anyway, EFISes are here to stay. They are also very different. Some are intuitive and easy going.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

No, you don’t need a “rating”, just an introduction by a CFI. For VFR flight you don’t have to learn much about it. And if you want to learn it – the world is open for it! There’s so many tools, books, apps, sims, …. anybody who wants to learn it, can.

And who doesn’t want to … ;-)

Last Edited by Flyer59 at 18 Dec 20:46

Peter wrote:

Whereas with simple avionics it is easy to focus on the AI and the ASI, for example, and this is not only easily taught but is easily retained even when way out of currency.

On the G1000, the AI is all over the PFD. Not something that you overlook easily.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

LeSving wrote:

Maybe so, but EFIS require a rating nowadays, which is equally insane because they are all different.

It requires “differences training” – not a rating. The distinction is important as the CAA is not involved – you don’t even need an ATO.

Last Edited by Airborne_Again at 19 Dec 09:09
ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

Differences training, right, that’s all you need (couldn’t remember the word).

I have also never heard that anybody learned “software architecture” to use a glass cockpit.

Flyer59 wrote:

No, you don’t need a “rating”, just an introduction by a CFI.

Same difference in my opinion (I got it btw, rating or not).

Flyer59 wrote:

For VFR flight you don’t have to learn much about it. And if you want to learn it – the world is open for it! There’s so many tools, books, apps, sims, …. anybody who wants to learn it, can.

The problem I have with this is you learn nothing new except the opaque “G1000 system” or “architecture”. There are other ways to design a MMI.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

On the G1000, the AI is all over the PFD. Not something that you overlook easily.

The horizon is; the rest isn’t. It’s a load of little numbers.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

IFR is a rating, aerobatics is, or CFI …. the differences training required to fly G1000 or Avidyne takes very little time (so where is the problem?)

The G1000 can indeed be a little much for a beginner, i agree. Avidyne Entegra or R9 are better for glass cockpit newcomers. The graphics are cleaner and less overloaded, of course there’s less features too. For example there is no synthetic vision available for Entegra, although it is for R9.

To me the main advantage is the gigantic AI and the route display in the HSI which makes attitude flying in IMC so much easier.

Our flying club just got its first club airplane with glass, a 172 with G1000. The acceptance is very high, actually it’s always booked out. Even the older members had no problem adapting to it.

In comparable IFR flight situations the glass cockpit with it’s precise system status messages should be a great improvement in safety. VFR … probably much the same.

Dynon and Garmin glass seem intimidating until you gain experience with them. More and more pilots with tablets are making a transition to glass flight planning, moving maps, synthetic vision, and the extended data derived from GPS.

Last Edited by USFlyer at 19 Dec 22:03

Flyer59 wrote:

(so where is the problem?)

There is a hidden architecture, a hidden “system integration”. Dynon and Garmin G3x touch are getting there. With those, there is nothing to learn, no hidden system of menus to remember, and therefore no “difference training” is needed.

Flyer59 wrote:

The acceptance is very high, actually it’s always booked out

People like glass, and it’s the future. But glass is not glass. It’s not before the g3x touch that Garmin is starting to get there in terms of user interface.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway
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