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Is this the lowest and highest pressure ever in/near Europe?

918 hPa at 18z Saturday, acc to Windy.

I noticed that the record value 920 hPa was for land based observations. For the North Atlantic, lower values have been recorded or estimated 2-3 times, with the lowest at 914 hPa in 1993.

huv
EKRK, Denmark

I am not sure who will go measure those, especially in mexican golf hurricanes or in middle of pacific

ESSEX, United Kingdom

Not sure if there are any ship based, but storm chasing is a thing for sure.
There are aviators that hunt hurricanes and I don’t mean the WWII Luftwaffe.
Quoting from above: Manned flights into hurricanes began in 1943 when, on a bet, pilot-trainer Colonel Joseph Duckworth flew a single-engine plane into a category 1 storm near Galveston, Texas.
No mention as to what the wager was…

tmo
EPKP - Kraków, Poland

Not possible to do that today or need an MOR after the flight

“1.4. Any phase of flight: (7) Operation with incorrect altimeter setting.”

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32015R1018&from=EN#page=14

ESSEX, United Kingdom

Ibra wrote:

I am not sure who will go measure those, especially in mexican golf hurricanes or in middle of pacific
The NOAA on a regular basis.
ESMK, Sweden

My barometer, over 120 years old, has 26" as the lowest mark. I think that’s about 880 hectopascals. Over an inch of mercury lower than 921.
Why do many altimeters have a restricted setting range? Our second-hand, (ex-Cessna?) one goes at least to 935, I tried winding it some weeks ago.

Maoraigh
EGPE, United Kingdom

There was a good weather documentary which featured NOAA at McDill AFB about 10 years ago; I’m pretty sure one of the pilots said he had a triple engine failure flying in one of the hurricanes. Still, a good advert for the WP-3D.

Maoraigh wrote:

My barometer, over 120 years old

Nice. Is it a marine one? If it’s lasted that long it must have been well made, and more likely to have a larger scale.

On altimeters, it’s probably cost saving based on normal or reasonable min/max values. Someone once showed me a disassembled altimeter, and what I found impressive was the coil to compensate for the non-linear change of pressure vertically in the atmosphere.

EGHP-LFQF-KCLW, United Kingdom

From the Iceland Review Online, referring to Friday:
“On the road by mt. Hafnarfjall between Reykjavík and Borgarnes, a steady wind speed of almost 30 metres per second and a particularly strong gust of wind measured 71 metres per second (159 miles per hour).”
PS Barometer scale is 25cm diameter, in 1m height oak frame. Standard fishing skipper item, in the room it was bought new for.

Maoraigh
EGPE, United Kingdom

Still windy:

2020-02-16 10:00z

ESMK, Sweden

Capitaine wrote:

On altimeters, it’s probably cost saving based on normal or reasonable min/max values

However, some EFIS seem to have a restricted range, and it would cost no more to make an electronic one go from 850 to 1100 than it would to make it go 950 to 1050.

Andreas IOM
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