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High EGT after cylinder replacement

That’s true but only if the connection goes bad, which in the absence of the lock washer is more likely because the screw and the nut are fiddly to tighten.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

A pilot is a pilot, a mechanic is a mechanic.
If you don’t trust your mechanic to provide the answer and the solution, WTF are you paying him for?

Forever learning
EGTB

Trust and verify….?

Stickandrudderman wrote:

A pilot is a pilot, a mechanic is a mechanic.
If you don’t trust your mechanic to provide the answer and the solution, WTF are you paying him for?

I somewhat agree with your sentiments, but the owner/operator of the aircraft is the one responsible in US regulations:

Subpart E—Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations

Sec. 91.403 General.

(a) The owner or operator of an aircraft is primarily responsible for maintaining that aircraft in an airworthy condition, including compliance with part 39 of this chapter.
Last Edited by NCYankee at 06 May 14:29
KUZA

Hello neighbour!

I actually saw two mechanics at your plane on Saturday when we came back from the “Sternflug”.

What boggles my mind is that any mechanic would release the aircraft to you in such a condition. A 300 degree EGT difference is huge enough to ground an engine until you know darn well what causes this. As for that replaced cylinder having zero compression, how has the new cylinder been run in? To set the piston rings you need to run the engine in a prescribed way and it’s definitly not enough to just run it on the ground. I am really no expert on this, but maybe the piston rings did not set properly after the exchange of the cylinder.

LSZH, Switzerland

The reason we use a laser thermometer is to remove the possibility of a mis reading EGT probe.

300F is a very large EGT difference and I would be surprised if there was not some indicator error involved in this.

I agree, although it would be rare for you to be getting the same reading on that probe in ambient temp, engine cooled down, etc. It is possible if a probe is about to fail though; they do read high due to erosion of the thermocouple junction, coupled with the open thermocouple detection method which in most instruments is just a pullup resistor which makes it read high when open.

A search here for e.g.

failing egt probe

digs out a number of good threads, particularly this one.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Mooney

The aircraft in fact was not released by MFGZ. The cylinder got exchanged on Thursday and they are now investigating the EGT issue which was not there before the cylinder got exchanged.
I asked them to first look at the G2 without running the engine to check if all sensors show the same ambient temp. The G2 has a probe analyses page and before exchanging anything they could swap the probe to see whether the fault wanders to the other cylinder.
It is also a mystery to me how a cylinder can show a comoression of 65 and 3 hours later 0.
One side of the inside wall showed clear chaffing signs. Maybe a piston ring got stuck and this also was the cause for the burnt valve?

LSZH


LSZH

somebody messed up.

Forever learning
EGTB
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