Menu Sign In Contact FAQ
Banner
Welcome to our forums

Deadstick Landing / Forced Landing / Off Field Landing

Spinning this off the Cirrus BRS pull yes/no thread.

This thread is intended to share all kinds of deadstick resources. From personal accounts to video “treasures” online. Goal is to engage mentally and, ideally, since fortunately deadstick landings are rare, to get some new viewing angle and input here that oneself will not manage to acquire (again, fortunately!).

I’ve never done a deadstick landing. I’ve done spot landing training, I’ve learned to keep a lookout always for possible landing fields, I keep in mind to „fly as far into the crash as possible“ and „minimum energy“. I brief myself before take of to, in case of, put the nose down and land straight ahead and resist to attempt the impossible turn etc.. lots of variables in any case.

Here’s a video for starters (EFATO)



EASA CB IR Training
Europe/Austria

There is an excellent book on the subject: Engine Out + Survival Tactics by Nate Jaros. He flies F16s for work and owns a V35 Bonanza.

EBKT

Good stuff here too


EASA CB IR Training
Europe/Austria

Thanks for the book recommendation. Will check it out.

EASA CB IR Training
Europe/Austria

Good read on stopping forces / energy dissipation:
https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/airplane_handbook/media/19_afh_ch17.pdf local copy

The typical light airplane is designed to provide protection in crash landings that expose the occupants to nine times the acceleration of gravity (9G) in a forward direction. Assuming a uniform 9G deceleration, at 50 mph the required stopping distance is about 9.4 feet. While at 100 mph, the stopping distance is about 37.6 feet—about four times as great. [Figure 17-2] Although these figures are based on an ideal deceleration process, it is interesting to note what can be accomplished in an effectively used short stopping distance. Understanding the need for a firm but uniform deceleration process in very poor terrain enables the pilot to select touchdown conditions that spread the breakup of dispensable structure over a short distance, thereby reducing the peak deceleration of the cabin area.

EASA CB IR Training
Europe/Austria

This one is interesting. Very intense breathing audible initially, seems to take a little bit, but then the pilot is composed and pretty determined („Ok I’m gonna f….in…“).

This unfortunate event happened to a friend of mine. He allowed me to upload the footage and he told me this information, “Routine pleasure flight cut extremely short. Fortunately for me, 200agl ruled out a turn attempt although I had the natural urge to try for a split second. FAA still working on cause. Possible ignition or induction system. Site examination ruled out bad fuel, mags, separated engine components. Everything under cowling was intact. Typical pilot error components confirmed not an issue with the video. Checked primer locked once stopped, so also non-issue. Happy to be alive.”



Last Edited by Snoopy at 21 Jan 05:48
EASA CB IR Training
Europe/Austria

since fortunately deadstick landings are rare

Are they? Its not everyday you experience a dead stick landing, but IME it is something that every GA pilot will experience once or twice in his life. Those we hear about are those who have gone bad, not the ones who have ended well. I have only had one, but I have had several precaution type landings due to different stuff.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

LeSving wrote:

Are they? Its not everyday you experience a dead stick landing, but IME it is something that every GA pilot will experience once or twice in his life. Those we hear about are those who have gone bad, not the ones who have ended well. I have only had one, but I have had several precaution type landings due to different stuff.

The generally accepted figure is that Lycosaurs fail once in 50,000 hours, so it is very unlikely that a GA pilot will have to experience an engine failure in his or hers life.

On the other hand it is reasonably likely that an average GA pilot will have this happen to someone nearby, e.g. in the same club.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

I’ve had two stoppages due to fuel servo icing (posted previously) and both were sorted with usual procedures.

If following the Cirrus approach, I would now be on my 3rd plane, and probably without hull insurance.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

f following the Cirrus approach, I would now be on my 3rd plane, and probably without hull insurance.

That’s not the way I understand the Cirrus philosophy (I don’t fly one, btw). IIRC you had ample time to troubleshoot, got it sorted and went on your merry way. Fine. In a Cirrus, you would have done the same, but then IF the engine did NOT come back, you’d pull the chute, absent an airport you could glide to. I cannot see what’s wrong with that.

13 Posts
Sign in to add your message

Back to Top