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Is an aircraft with trailing link gear harder to push backwards?

This “puzzle” is being done to death on one members-only site

Assume a flat surface, and assume (if that’s valid) that the angle of the trailing link remains constant during the pushing.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

How many trailing ‘hand pushable’ light aircraft are there ?
The lovely Rockwell Commander 114 springs to mind.
TB’s, are they ‘trailing’ ?
Will have to take a look at various.
If you start getting into 6 seater twins they are going to be hard to push by definition.
Really thinking grass on that one – nice level tarmac can’t see trailing been that much of a problem.
Arguably easier to pull forward than push back, but when full aircraft weight is on those trailing arms they (the arms) are near horizontal so should not be much of an issue.
Incidental some times worries me when I see aircraft been pushed back by three or four folk on the wings. Nobody has anything to ‘grab’ (breaking effect) should the aircraft get away down a slight slope.
I like to be on the prop (SEP) pushing at the root so can apply negative retardation if required.
Never seem to be enough people about to have the luxury of a qualified person in a ‘break seat’.

Regret no current medical
Sandtoft EGCF, North England, United Kingdom

Of cause with a nose wheel tow bar that person can steer (to some extent) AND apply retardation.

Regret no current medical
Sandtoft EGCF, North England, United Kingdom

Cirruses, aren’t they trailing gear, too ?

EDLN, Germany

Cirrus. Negative. The actual legs holding the wheels (fixed gear) are inaffect a piece of spring steel (cart spring). Very simple and light weight.
Sure don’t think any fixed gear with the weight / luxuary of trailing arm.

Regret no current medical
Sandtoft EGCF, North England, United Kingdom

Might even be a composite.

Regret no current medical
Sandtoft EGCF, North England, United Kingdom

WarleyAir wrote:

How many trailing ‘hand pushable’ light aircraft are there ?

DA20, DA40, A211, all Rallye-aircraft, Cirrus SR series… there are some.

I don’t know about the SR, DA20 and co, but the Rallyes can be a real PITA to manoeuvre pushing it back. If the towbar isn’t maintained well and has little play, you need to balance quite a lot and with force, especially with the heavier airframes like the Minerva. If people want to “help” and start pushing the wings, chances are you can’t steer the aircraft anymore – period.

mh
Inside the sky.
EDXE, EDXF, Germany

I do not think so unless the gear is really soggy. The PC-12 has trailing gear and is quite easy to push backwards with one person at each wing.

Sweden, Sweden

Correction , TB retractables are trailing arm – not sure what the spring is – think oleo

Cirrus SR trailing arm!! – don’t think so. Simple springy mounting legs I think.
Mind you not sure what goes on inside those spats but sure don’t see room for fancy trailing arms.

Last Edited by WarleyAir at 08 Mar 14:49
Regret no current medical
Sandtoft EGCF, North England, United Kingdom

The reason I posted that question is because I think it is an interesting puzzle.

It seems obvious to me that if the trailing link angle does not change i.e. there is no movement in this bearing

then the training link cannot make any difference to the force required to push it backwards.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom
21 Posts
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