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Is the FAA 91.411 and 91.413 altimeter check required outside the USA, and mandatory stickers?

CFR 14 43.9 dealing with maintenance. preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alteration and CFR 14 43.11 for inspections could not be any simpler and appendix E only required the date and maximum altitude on the instrument, otherwise the detail is handled in the normal way as described in 43.9.

There is no requirement to maintain a flight log for the aircraft nor is there a requirement to keep log entries for most things longer than the time period that the maintenance, preventive maintenance, or inspection is repeated or superseded by other work or for 1 year after the work is performed.. So once a new annual is completed, there is no need to keep the record of the old annuals. Only certain things need to be kept in permanent logs or provided to the FAA. This is detailed in CFR 91.417.

KUZA, United States

Unfortunately, N-reg maintenance in Europe is done (in light GA) almost exclusively by companies who do EASA Part M all day long, so the implementations get a bit fuzzy… Excessive stickers is about 1% of what goes on. In one case a DER 8110 design package was required for the screws to attach a TAS605 to the floor of the luggage compartment.

If everyone who has an N-reg was proactive in maintenance (vast majority of owners – all regs – don’t want to get involved) and had a hangar where freelance A&P/IA people could work, this wouldn’t be much of an issue. There is a fair % of knucklehead A&Ps too (and ones who can’t or won/t read the FARs) but the great thing about freelancers is that you can avoid those…

Also, at least over here, having a long maintenance record is a big help when it comes to selling your plane. Probably a number of reasons for that, one of which is that a lot of maintenance is itself suspect.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

The bill for this job was about 400 quid. It’s a bit more than I normally paid (£200-300). Plus travel, if applicable.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Two years later I am back to this one…

Can anyone recommend a company which doesn’t require the opening up of the panel, to apply the stickers to everything?

For about 15 years I managed without the crazy stickers and now suddenly everybody is doing them – even on things which the FAA reg doesn’t require them.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

Two years later I am back to this one…

Can anyone recommend a company which doesn’t require the opening up of the panel, to apply the stickers to everything?

For about 15 years I managed without the crazy stickers and now suddenly everybody is doing them – even on things which the FAA reg doesn’t require them.

Yes, this stickeritis is annoying, but there may be a way to deal. Get a stickerbook and start collecting there. Depending on your mood either PollyPocket or Transformers will do, as long as Panini issues a GA one … can’t wait to see a ramp check guy looking at it :-).

Last Edited by at 11 Feb 10:19

The reason I prefer the standard written record (glued into the airframe log) is that it takes about an hour to dismantle enough stuff to reach the altimeters. There is then just enough room to push the sticker roughly onto the right instrument. The old stickers are virtually impossible to remove (they have a permanent adhesive anyway) so after years you would get a build up of stickers. In one case they have to wrap the sticker around the tube going to the altimeter! That’s what the last company did. Which leads to the question: does the FAA prescribe the maximum distance along the tube? If not (and for sure they don’t) then surely anywhere on the tube would do. So, logically, I could just run a length of the static tube to the luggage compartment, blank it off there, and all the stickers could be conveniently stuck to it

Luckily I have a number of months to find somebody who is pragmatic… if anyone has any ideas, I am “all ears” Doesn’t have to be in the UK. And I have the serial numbers of everything, from the last time it was done.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

From AC43-6D:

Note: For altimeters of the air data computer type that consist of multiple components, an authorized person should mark or attach the label to the air data computer unless impractical. If an authorized person cannot mark or attach the label, he or she should provide the information on the accompanying FAA Form 8130-3, Authorized Release Certificate, Airworthiness Approval Tag.
When testing is performed on the aircraft and entries are made directly into the maintenance log or permanent records, a label is not required.

So you don’t have to fit labels after all.

Avionics geek.
Fairoaks. EGTF

wigglyamp wrote:

When testing is performed on the aircraft and entries are made directly into the maintenance log or permanent records, a label is not required.

Applying a label is obviously intended to apply to bench top work only. I’ve never come across anybody applying a sticker when the testing is performed on the aircraft.

Last Edited by Silvaire at 11 Feb 22:11

Could you tell that to a certain company you know well, wigglyamp

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

I’m the only one there doing FAR checks now – I did one last week. It has stickers from the previous guy!

Avionics geek.
Fairoaks. EGTF
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