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Lufthansa flight nearly collides with Drone near Warsaw

There has been a number of these here in the UK, according to reports.

Most seem to be the small quadcopters.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Stockholm/Bromma airport has been closed several times the past year because of drones in the control zone. In one case the pilot was located (it was a real estate agent, IIRC). Hopefully that case will go to court.

I think that authorities are rapidly losing control of the drone situation. The rules in Sweden are pretty clear, but people don’t know or care.

Last Edited by Airborne_Again at 22 Jul 20:17
ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

People will know and will care after the first serious incident.
As always, authorities in general and politics in particular run behind the facts.
Let us hope there are not too many victims.

And the issue pops up everywhere, here is one more chilling story.

Last Edited by at 22 Jul 20:30
EBZH Kiewit, Belgium

There will be ADS-B across the board for all drones and all aircraft in the future. Zero doubt about that. It will just take the crash of an airliner before it gets legislated…

In the US they’re bitc*ing about the loss of freedom as it gets mandatory in 2020 – and I can see that – but at the same time, I’d rather be safer than not. Even if it means NSA and MI6 will know my every move from that moment on.

Last Edited by AdamFrisch at 22 Jul 20:47

Just legislate the quadcopter engines to be of the lycosaurus variety, with (double for redundancy) delco fixed advance ignition, oil change every 25h and pressurized ignition harnesses – drone problem instantly solved.

Shorrick_Mk2 wrote:

Just legislate the quadcopter engines to be of the lycosaurus variety, with (double for redundancy) delco fixed advance ignition, oil change every 25h and pressurized ignition harnesses – drone problem instantly solved.

Brilliant! Send this idea to the Californian lawmakers who are just preparing and anti-drone law. Reason being that some idiots flew drones into the paths of firefighting aircraft. That doesn’t go down well round here…..

That said, AFAIK the latest version of some of these things have geofences built in and will not fly in the vicinity of an airport. This, of course, can be hacked, but it might keep some kids away from bringing down an airliner. Would of course not work with fire TFRs, as they pop up if and when needed and won’t be in any database.

Jan_Olieslagers wrote:

As always, authorities in general and politics in particular run behind the facts.

And isn’t that the truth. Drones are here to stay, but reality far outruns any rulemaking.

Last Edited by 172driver at 22 Jul 21:22

If they simple legislated that inside the box of every drone that is sold, must be a copy of the rules for the country that it’s being sold into, it would probably help a lot.

EIKH Kilrush

IMHO the biggest problem is that there is a significant sub-community (within the drone flying community) which believes in zero erosion of their civil liberties.

There are loads of videos on youtube of very stupid flying, like FPV stuff to FL-lots, in CAS, and clearly avoiding airliners only by luck. I vaguely recall FL200 being reached, and it is fairly easily done, not with a quadcopter but with a normal model plane, and with a directional (probably servo-tracked) antenna on the ground, and a way-above-legal-power transmitter to maintain contact.

The GPS “fences” are not in current products sold in the UK, and anyway they will never be in FPV aircraft which don’t use GPS for self-navigation.

I suppose one good thing is that FPV needs a lot more money and dedication than just buying a quadcopter for 1000 quid which can carry a decent camera and which can almost fly itself. Also with FPV (and traditional model aircraft generally) you smash up a lot of stuff, which makes it an expensive hobby, and most people don’t have that much stamina.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

FPV ????

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