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Importing an airplane from N-reg/C-reg to EASA

arj1 wrote:

Anyone? I’m just curious if the a/c was produced and certified in the US, can it be imported and put on the EASA registry?
Assuming the TC holder (design organisation) still exists and OK.

Check the TIP of US <> EU BASA.

Freelance IRI / CB-IR Instructor
LOWG | Worldwide

Airborne_Again wrote:

You mean Annex I aircraft can’t be imported!?

Well , we are speaking ‘importing into the EASA airworthiness system’ which by definition excludes Annex I. So no, it cannot be imported in that sense.

Antonio
LESB, Spain

Snoopy wrote:

@antonio
Are you sure about this? The BASA US EU treaty should make grandfathering irrelevant.

EU and US accept TC vice versa.

One matter is acceptance of each others’ compliance tests or other cert processes, to issue your own TC, a different matter is accepting the other’s TC directly. That just does not happen.

For used aircraft, from the TIP rev 6::

7.4 Used Aircraft Exported to the U.S. or the EU for which a Design Approval Has Been
Granted
7.4.1 The importing Authority will accept an Export Certificate of Airworthiness on
used aircraft identified in paragraphs 2.2.3 and 2.3.3, for import only if a TC
holder exists to support continuing airworthiness of such aircraft and when
exporting Authority certifies that each aircraft:
7.4.1.1 Conforms to the type design approved (or grandfathered by EASA) by
__the exporting Authority and importing Authority as specified in their__
respective TCDSs…

For new aircraft, the specific case where an EASA TCDS does not exist, but there is a grandfathered type approval, then it can be imported:

New Aircraft Exported to the U.S. or the EU for which a Design Approval Has Been
Granted
7.3.1 Except as provided in paragraph 7.13, the importing Authority will accept an
Export Certificate of Airworthiness on new aircraft identified in paragraphs
2.2.3 and 2.3.3, when the exporting Authority certifies that each aircraft:
7.3.1.1 Conforms to a type design approved (or grandfathered by EASA) by
the importing Authority, as specified in the importing Authority’s TCDS;
7.3.1.2 Conforms to a type design approved as modified by each STC and
design change by the importing Authority;
7.3.1.3 Has undergone a final operational check;
7.3.1.4 Is in a condition for safe operation, including compliance with
applicable importing Authority ADs;
7.3.1.5 Is marked in accordance with paragraph 7.15; and
7.3.1.6 Meets all additional requirements prescribed by the importing Authority
in paragraph 7.15 as notified.
7.3.2 Each new aircraft imported to the U.S. or the EU will have an Export
Certificate of Airworthiness. The Export Certificate of Airworthiness should
contain the following statement: “The [insert aircraft MODEL] covered by this
certificate conforms to the type design approved under [insert U.S. or EASA
Type Certificate Number [INSERT TYPE CERTIFICATE NUMBER and
REVISION LEVEL], and is found to be in a condition for safe operation,”
and/or any other “import requirements” text as specified in the [insert U.S. or
EASA] TCDS.
7.3.3 For aircraft grandfathered on the basis of an FAA type certification basis but
for which EASA has not yet issued an EASA TC, the FAA shall certify that the
aircraft model conforms to the FAA TC and is in a condition for safe
__operatio. The pre-printed certifying statement on the FAA Form 8130-4 is__
sufficient, and no other additional information in the Exceptions block is
necessary.
Note: Grandfathered aircraft means aircraft with a TC grandfathered under
__Article 2.3 of Commission Regulation EC 748/20__

The EASA prodcut list @Snoopy posted before lists types both with and without EASA TCDS. Those without an EASA TCDS are grandfathered types:

Snoopy wrote:

See approved/valid airplanes here, including C150:
https://www.easa.europa.eu/download/easa-product-lists/EASA-PRODUCT-LIST-Small-Aeroplanes.pdf
Antonio
LESB, Spain

Thank you!

Freelance IRI / CB-IR Instructor
LOWG | Worldwide
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