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Latest on 8.33 requirements (merged)

Peter wrote:

The schemes where you wire multiple headsets to the back of the radio directly tend to not work so well especially if headset brands are mixed. It’s a common problem with flying school planes.

It depends on the radio. The Garmin GTR 225A that I put in a couple of years back has separate outputs for two sets of headsets and a built in intercom and will work fine with a mix of headsets. It would work perfectly for a 2 seat trainer.

Andreas IOM

Just in case anyone in the UK isn’t there yet:

Some good news to share amongst your members…

After much negotiation with the EU, we have been granted an amendment to our contract that allows us to accept more 8.33 kHz funding claims. This is the fourth tranche period and will close on 30th September 2018. As before, all eligible purchases from 16th February 2016 are able to claim the 20% rebate.

We have also been able to increase the maximum cap on handheld devices that means we can permit the more capable transportable communication systems that are becoming available for balloons.

There is still plenty of funding available and we need people to act quickly as there cannot be any further extension.

This extension was in recognition that many of the GA users had not been able to purchase or install radios before the previous 31st December 2017 deadline, and also that many had been reticent to purchase having heard rumour that some of the European countries were simply not going to abide by the change and wrongly expected the UK to reject it.

The timing of the extension, ending on 30th September 2018, further reinforces the change in UK law whereby from 1st January 2019, if your flight mandates carriage of a radio, then it must be 8.33 kHz capable.

Note that the common sporting frequencies are still able to operate on 25 kHz up to end of this year, but from 1st January 2019 they will be moving to an 8.33 kHz channel, so the aircraft (and any ground service) wishing to use them will similarly need to use an 8.33 kHz capable radio.

The claim form and details are on the CAA’s GA website:

http://www.caa.co.uk/General-aviation/Aircraft-ownership-and-maintenance/8-33-kHz-radios/

We would appreciate if you could share this good news with your membership and encourage them to equip early and apply for the rebate.

Please do ask if you have any questions or comments.
EGKB Biggin Hill

Does anybody know whats the current situation in Denmark/Sweden? I need to fly EKSV – ESSV on 25 kHz only aircraft. Preliminary research shows only 25kHz frequencies enroute..

EERI EETU, Estonia

ivark wrote:

Does anybody know whats the current situation in Denmark/Sweden? I need to fly EKSV – ESSV on 25 kHz only aircraft. Preliminary research shows only 25kHz frequencies enroute..

In Sweden, from a regulation point of view, you are required to carry 8.33 kHz equipment if you are going to fly in airspace where radio communication is required. It doesn’t matter if you expect to only use 25 kHz channels.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

After reading about the Garmin on here I have a wish to replace (via my yet-to-be-selected avionics shop) my KX155 with a GNC255A. The aircraft is a G-reg C172.

I am confused about whether this is permitted under CS-STAN, specifically:

1. At first I thought it wasn’t covered as there is no mention of “ILS” in CS-STAN. However, I see CS-SC056b EXCHANGE OF VOR EQUIPMENT refers to “VOR equipment including Localizer/Glideslope indicator and converter”. Does this mean the ILS function of the 255 is covered?

2. I would be interfacing to the existing KI-209 indicator. Does “the equipment is compatible with connections to existing flight management/navigation systems” refer to more than strict plug compatible? That is, can the existing wiring be re-terminated with a different connector to suit the 255’s tray?

It seems several members have done this upgrade. What approach did you take to certification?

Old dog learning new tricks

A couple of people who might know the answer are @GarryIAE and @wigglyamp

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

There is a free-of-charge EASA Minor change (created by Gama Aviation at Fairoaks) on Garmin’s dealer site so no additional certification paperwork is required.

Avionics geek.
Fairoaks. EGTF

That suggests that only a Garmin dealer gets access to it Doesn’t EASA have a database? They do have some but I think it is only STCs… not sure when I last saw it.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Hi Christopher

Whoever you purchased the GNC 255A from should be able to provide you with the Minor Change paperwork Harry (wigglyamp) is referring to. You can use CS-STAN but you would need to demonstrate that the design complies with the applicable chapters of it, far easier to use the existing Minor change. The minor change does have wiring diagrams in the design pack and yes the KI209 interface is shown in there. Naturally you would need a B2 licensed engineer to certify the installation.

EGTC, United Kingdom

Thanks Garry and Harry.

The supplier (UK dealer) did say there was a Garmin minor change but only if installed by a Garmin dealer. My problem is the a/c is based in Malta and there are zero avionics shops on the island, as you will appreciate. I was hoping to find a B2 in Sicily (doubtful) or southern Italy. I haven’t checked but I believe it would be considerably harder to find a Garmin dealer within a reasonable distance. I think the work itself should be relatively straightforward.

I would have thought it easy to demonstrate compliance with CS-STAN. The radio is in the same place and has the same functionality as the one it is replacing, and is ETSO’d. The only other changes would be re-termination of the connectors. But no doubt there is a whole bunch of paperwork to be generated and signed in blood…

Any B2 out there fancy a weekend break in Malta?

Old dog learning new tricks
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