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Qualifications for doing avionics work (EASA-reg and N-reg)?

Thanks for posting that, NCYankee.

It does suggest that an A&P can install a transponder, so long as the installation is then tested by a 145 company.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

It does suggest that an A&P can install a transponder, so long as the installation is then tested by a 145 company.

I don’t believe that the transponder needs to be installation checked IAW 91.413 after maintenance or new replacement as long as there is a reasonable possibility of the data correspondence error would not be affected. IOW, if the transponder has a green tag (8130-3) from an avionics 145 shop or the manufacturer, an A&P can install it (electrical connections only) without another test being performed other than the self test. Replacing the encoder would require a retest by a 145 shop or if the encoder was an integral part of the transponder (which some are, this is a bad idea IMHO).

KUZA, United States

Recently I have had some discussions off-forum about who can do avionics work on an N-reg, and it has been confirmed that – as above posts basically say – that the work needs to be done by or under the supervision of an A&P i.e. avionics installation work goes under the heading of “airframe”.

There is a lot of disinformation going around saying that you must have a 145 shop to do it, or that there is some “avionics A&P” qualification. Both are not true.

The only advantage of being an FAA 145 company is as per NCYankee’s posts above i.e. if disturbing the static pipework. But one can get around that by doing the 91.413 check afterwards at a 145 facility. Well, there is another advantage: they can print off fresh 8130-3 forms (within their approval limits) for the old stuff they remove so you can get more money for it on US Ebay

This is an important concession for N-reg owners who are much more free to use freelance avionics installers. Practically speaking an A&P needs to inspect the finished job, since he obviously isn’t going to be checking every wire.

(I have merged 2 old threads)

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

who can do avionics work on an N-reg, and it has been confirmed that – as above posts basically say – that the work needs to be done by or under the supervision of an A&P i.e. avionics installation work goes under the heading of “airframe”.

Correct.

As an A&P/IA working independently, I take a hybrid approach to avionics Installations :

I have a very reputable, fully dedicated FAA Avionics Licensed company in the US design, produce CAD working drawings & documentation and produce fully built out be-spoke wiring harnesses for each project. These harness are absolutely First-Rate , fully digital labeling and bench tested before delivery.

My job is then to remove the old equipment, isolate wiring that stays in place and then physically installe the new which is pretty much plug & play with just ground & power lugs to be cut and crimped.

The end result is far better than the typical light GA “Dyke & Splice” retro-fits that I see day-in-day-out …

Last Edited by Michael at 16 Jun 05:54
FAA A&P/IA
LFPN

Avionics can indeed be installed / signed off by an FAA IA/A&P. In fact when we have had avionics installed by an EASA Avionics outfit, our IA has done the paperwork on their behalf and it is only recently that I realised they could do the paperwork/work themselves.

One thing though, in one aircraft we have a lot of avionics kit we want to transfer to another – G430W/GMA340/GTX330 etc., now I understand this needs to go to Garmin for ‘recertification’ and new paperwork (8130) before it can be installed in the other (identical) aircraft. Is this the case?

EGHS

Not if the destination aircraft is also N-reg, unless somebody likes to collect 8130-3 forms

See e.g. here

EASA-reg is a different thing – a huge amount of debate here previously… e.g. here and here but much of it is inconclusive due to differering views and EASA reg interpretations by different avionics installers.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

But one can get around that by doing the 91.413 check afterwards at a 145 facility.

How do you legally fly the aircraft to the Repair Station?

EGPD / OMDW / YPJT, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

Not if the destination aircraft is also N-reg, unless somebody likes to collect 8130-3 forms

Great, thanks Peter :)

EGHS
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