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Is there ANY reason now to do a registry transfer EASA to EASA?

I am not aware of any.

Apart from vanity

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

What's happening with the "sort of different" levels of CofA that there are in Germany and France, for example... where you need a CofA which allows NVFR/IFR etc.

If I understood we never had that in the UK as it was down to the pilot to decide if the aircraft was equipped, is that correct?

Would that be a reason... or (fear of mis-quoting again :) ) will SERA fix this?.........

edited... for a P.S. How the hell do you do the smiley face??????

I believe there will be differences as there are AMCs (accepted means of compliance) and a lot of the finer details will remain up to the implementing CAAs. So far only FCL is in effect, i.e. the licensing. More will come in the future.

SERA only touches ATC.

I can mention few of them, at least when moving from I to G

1) Night VFR allowed for helicopters (R44).Strange it might seem you can fly(in Italian airspace) a G registered R44 but you cannot fly the same one if I registered. 2) New Avionics available with no bureaucratic delay (for instance Garmin GTN). Italy requires Ministry of Telecommunications approval besides local CAA's. This usually comes 12-18 months after the market release. 3) Engine overhaul non mandatory upon reaching the TBO (private user). Italy mandates the overhaul at TBO. 4) Last but not least, the CAA. Don't expect the same level of service/efficiency across Europe. Sometimes even getting somebody answering the phone call might be a problem.

So why isn't everybody on G-reg?

I suppose people are put off by the can of worms which a registry transfer might open. A plane can be full of mods and repairs done off the books, missing ADs, etc, for decades, until a registry transfer...

How the hell do you do the smiley face??????

See the Posting Tips link above the box where you enter the text

That covers just the two emoticons and But in general, you can drop in any little GIF etc image you like using the Image option e.g. this URL http://peter-ftp.co.uk/icons2/rolling.gif (my space but you are welcome to reference it) will give you this

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Bonus! Got it... there was me entering :) ;) )-D and any other combination until I was #-( .... lol!

I wonder how the costs compare, for example between a UK CofA and a DE CofA for example; in terms of what you get for the money... I'm not pertaining to be an expert by any stretch, I only picked up stuff about it while I am looking at the options for my next step further into the hobby; all I am doing at the moment is trying to understand whether it would be possible for me to start a Non-Equity share (or similar) from a legal and financial angle from where I am based. Mainly due to flexibility and availability. I would love the ability to do an overnight at very short notice... currently have to give 3 days notice (as an example; but this is a club rule not a German rule)

The conclusion I came to is that, from what I can currently see (prepared to be corrected) the UK actually seems the most flexible CofA arrangement.

A zero-equity share (renting, in effect) is tricky in certain respects.

On a G-reg, if you are renting (in fact if you have any shareholders with less than 5%) then the plane has to be maintained to a higher standard. This used to be the old "Public Transport" CofA.

I have been off G-reg since 2005 so I am not up to date, but it used to mean stuff like NO pilot maintenance (so, an outrageous £600 for a 50hr check on a TB20) and some "creative interpretations" of the regs.

I hope another G-reg owner will be able to fill in the details but I vaguely recall hearing that since the two different CofA categories were merged, the "Public Transport" maintenance requirements settled somewhere between the two previous regimes.

Whereas with an N-reg you could rent it out while keeping it under FAR Part 91.

With a G-reg there isn't the stupid "IFR Certificate" which Germany runs. That seems potentially very valuable because if your CAMO says that you need e.g. two 8.33 radios, they have you over a barrel. You can't ditch your CAMO - well not without a lot of hassle and paying for stuff twice.

Zero-equity syndication also has tax implications, in the UK. It cost me a lot of money to discover that my accountant didn't understand this area well.

The other problem with zero equity is that you will get a lot of people who want something for nothing. GA is full of them. And since you don't want cowboys who are going to wreck you plane, you will end up being quite fussy about who you rent it to.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

With a G-reg there isn't the stupid "IFR Certificate" which Germany runs. That seems potentially very valuable because if your CAMO says that you need e.g. two 8.33 radios, they have you over a barrel. You can't ditch your CAMO - well not without a lot of hassle and paying for stuff twice.

It's not an airworthiness requirement but an equipment requirement for all aircraft flying over the territory of Germany. With a D-reg airplane and a shop in Germany, the rule is well known and "enforced". With a G-reg you would have to do the annual outside of Germany to be able to violate the rule more easily. That might not be practical for an airplane stationed outside of the country. And in any case, you'd be violating German law which not everybody might be comfortable with.

@Peter, thanks for taking the time to write that. Any information is great at this stage. The only experience I have of plane ownership was a 1/12 share in a C152. We did all get involved, so I'm not a complete novice... but it was under JAR, so before CAMO and this greater EU integration, which leaves me somewhat less informed.

I really don't know which way to go at the moment. As you know I am doing my IR, because I want to take my flying to the next level and so a G-Reg would be attractive from that point of view. There are some things that have niggled me, returning to the rental fleets from shared ownership, and that is the per hour cost, has gone way up; about doubled. I do like to think that I am a considerate pilot when it comes to power settings and fuel consumption... but rental is by the hour and so there is no motivation not to rag the [email protected][email protected] off it, because the cost per flight hour is constant, so it's cheaper to rag it (I don't btw; just making my point); and also the club has a rule about 3 days notice for any form of overnight. It feels hard that a freedom is eroded, because if by a miracle I have finished work by 16:00 on a Friday I could jump in the plane and fly somewhere to stay with a friend/family and return early on Saturday morning leaving it free for someone else from about 10/11am. My old share group had a rule of not more than 24 hours without asking the rest of the group... so that was a real bonus for me.

What I am thinking, at the moment, (I wont decide probably for another year or more) is to look at something like a Diesel Powered C172 or PA28; if I could start a Non-Equity or 5% share... because the cost per hour can go right down with fuel usage being the main chunk and the diesel lumps will have 1 more year of heritage, but this is all providing I can get the the hourly usage high enough to amortise the cost effectively over the used hours.

The type of flying I would like to do, is some longer trips, say over the alps to northern Italy to visit family once I have my IR; and some return trips to the UK, so cost per NM becomes very interesting.

I do want to understand how much maintenance I could do on my own, and a few other bits... I will just keep chipping away at it over the rest of the year; I have my IR stuff to worry about... Medical Friday, wish me luck

It's not an airworthiness requirement but an equipment requirement for all aircraft flying over the territory of Germany.

So if it is just a MEL, why do the German CofAs have an IFR tick box on them? I have been told that a German CAMO charges a lot extra for putting a tick in this box.

Would it not just be a case of in an incident you have to prove that the MEL was complied with?

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