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Flying in Europe and where to base N-Reg experimental / homebuilt in Europe?

Hmm France is too far away unfortunately. I’m at Zurich region, so could maybe base it in Austria if needed (LOIH Hohenems)

Switzerland

So, you have switched ideas from a certified 6-seat pressurized turbine aircraft to an uncertified 2-seat SEP?

Mainz (EDFZ), Germany

So, you have switched ideas from a certified 6-seat pressurized turbine aircraft to an uncertified 2-seat SEP?

Well, not exactly. It is not an either/or decision in my mind. The experimental is more like a “for fun” kind of thing to fly myself or with friends, similar to how car guys have an old-timer convertible that only gets pulled out on sunny Sundays.

The turbine is more in the “personal airliner” category: get me + family reliably from a to b. Currently planning demo flights with PA46 and Silver Eagle.

Back on topic: Is it confirmed that for an LN or SE reg I have to pay VAT there even though I am not basing it in these countries?

Switzerland

HBadger wrote:

Is it confirmed that for an LN or SE reg I have to pay VAT there even though I am not basing it in these countries?

No, not confirmed, but looking at the regulations, to get it on LN reg the owner has to be a Norwegian entity or person, or live in Norway. A Norwegian wouldn’t probably pay VAT without actually importing it, but then you are into a different set of rules (import/export etc). It doesn’t look like it needs to be in Norway. but an experimental aircraft? how that is supposed to become LN without actually importing it for the physical process of getting it approved (get a CoA on it), looks difficult.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

Quite interesting.
If I understood things correctly (both from this thread and others referring to operational limitations) and please do correct me if I understood it wrong, with a N-reg one can fly whatever (VFR, NVFR, IFR) as long it is not limited by the paperwork of the aircraft.
Price to pay is one needs to request authorization in each and every country one plans to fly to/cross and, apart Germany, it might be complicated to park/base the ACFT.

With an EU-reg no NVFR or IFR is allowed (with the exception of Scandinavia) even if the paperwork would allow it (which is the case ,equipment permitting for at least LN and SE-regs).
Advantage is one can cross (most EU) borders freely.
Thank you in advance for your comments.

MZ
Germany

Info Switzerland:
It is presently not possible to import a foreign (N or anywhere else) homebuilt aircraft into CHE and get the Swiss HB- reg. Only doable for a certified ship.
There have been a couple of Swiss homebuilts exported to Austria and Germany, reregistered there, but not the other way round.

Life's short... enjoy!
LSZF, Switzerland

That’s amazing. Is this permanent? I thought there was a fair number of e.g. Lancairs based in CH. Why would they block new ones?

I wonder how @Euroavion got on with his project.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

hi Peter
Suppose you’re referencing my previous post?
Today we have 176 homebuilts flying in Switzerland, also a few Lancairs, but they have all been built in Switzerland, unless there is an exception to prove me wrong. I know build quality is the factor, as not all EU and non-EU countries apply the same standards.
A homebuilt project can be started abroad, and then imported and registered into CHE, but only if it is still a project and has not been registered abroad.

Last Edited by DeeCee57 at 05 May 15:30
Life's short... enjoy!
LSZF, Switzerland

Afaik you can still import eg an N reg into Switzerland, you just have to keep the N reg and ask FOCA permission every year.
That way, you can even fly IFR in some countries (for example Germany), which you couldn’t do with an HB reg. But of course border crossings are a bit more cumbersome, at least if you do everything by the book.

Switzerland

HBadger, yes you can import a N homebuilt into Switzerland, and yes you must keep it N registered since there is no other option.
You then just have to “give away” the ownership to a thrust, pay import taxes and duty, and then find an FAA licensed engineer for your condition inspection once a year, unless you have a repairman certificate as the builder.
Also to fly abroad you will need a FAA based on or full pilot licence.

Life's short... enjoy!
LSZF, Switzerland
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