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Non EASA aircraft - an exact definition?

Well, you will find the exakt definition on Annex II aircraft in…. Annex II of the Basic Regulation! :)

You will also find on page 62 in this document:
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:02008R0216-20130129&from=EN

Sweden, Sweden

Thanks for that, Fly310.

That’s a clear definition of Annex 2. Well, some bits are ambiguous… like the military service bit.

However, non EASA aircraft is all of Annex 2, plus some other stuff e.g. ultralights.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

I wonder what you do if you have (for instance) one of these? local copy

FAA certified (and never an AD) but no EASA TC. Initial design established after 1955, no historic relevance, not for research, not amateur built, no miltary service, not an ultralight of any kind. I think the answer is to keep it on N-register.

FAA certified (and never an AD) but no EASA TC

Hmmm what about other examples of that – are they non EASA planes too? The Jetprop cannot have an EASA TC AFAIK. Or maybe it is just that EASA doesn’t accept the conversion STC?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Somebody in Germany knows the answer to my Meyers 200D question above… Link

Last Edited by Silvaire at 22 Mar 03:50

Peter wrote:

However, non EASA aircraft is all of Annex 2, plus some other stuff e.g. ultralights.

Ultralights are also Annex II. Everything that is not EASA aircraft is Annex II.

Sweden, Sweden

OK, but that takes up back to what exactly is non EASA aircraft. Take Silvaire’s example of an FAA TC with no EASA TC.

This discussion is interesting if one starts looking for planes which are non EASA but still “fully capable” i.e. ICAO CofA, IFR, maybe retractable, etc.

A non EASA plane with a full ICAO CofA is very useful, not least because it isn’t subject to parking limits if “foreign reg” – like homebuilts are in most countries.

Also, in the UK you have the national PPL and the NPPL which after April 2018 will be limited (by EU decree) to non EASA planes only, but these licenses have extremely useful medical concessions – see here. Admittedly these medical concessions can’t be used outside the UK.

Annex 2 have big maintenance concessions also.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Yes, I am not sure if the Meyers is Annex II or not but I couldn’t find it in this list of EASA Type Certificates:
https://www.easa.europa.eu/download/easa-product-lists/EASA-PRODUCT-LIST-Small-Aeroplanes.pdf

I am not sure if this list is complete but it was last updated in November 2016. If you know of any other unusual airplanes, please try to find them in the list and we can see what the result is.

Sweden, Sweden

Peter wrote:

A non EASA plane with a full ICAO CofA is very useful, not least because it isn’t subject to parking limits if “foreign reg” – like homebuilts are in most countries.

The problem with that is the plane may become an “EASA plane” at any time.

But I still don’t get it. Are you talking actual individual aircraft or just what can potentially be ? A non EASA full ICAO etc, will have to be on a non EASA country register. Then you are subjected to the regulations and licence requirements on that register to fly it. If you try to get it on local register, it most certainly would end up as an EASA plane. It may theoretically end up in Annex II, but that seems, to me at least, like a very strange thing for the authorities to do when the plane is fully ICAO compliant ?

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

In Poland ultralights are not even planes (as in, flight hours don’t count for squat) and I’m pretty sure they don’t fall under Annex II here either :-) AFAIR the explanation was that the difference is in the maintenance (well, registration / CoA) regimen, and yes, should one chose to build a UL as a homebuilt, under the NAA’s oversight, it would grow up to be a plane, which I believe would then fall under Annex II. IFR included, last time I checked, but with all the caveats of getting permits for flying elsewhere (beaten to death countless times here).

tmo
EPKP - Kraków, Poland
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