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NORSEE certification and EASA aircraft

hello

i have seen this neat standbye instrument https://aerovonics.com/av-20-1
does anyone know how/if that NORSEE certification can be also used on a EASA plane? I guess probably not?

fly2000

NORSEE doesn’t apply to EASA aircraft. The nearest thing is CS-STAN.

Avionics geek.
Fairoaks. EGTF

There is a somewhat inconclusive thread on CS-STAN here and it is mentioned in many other threads. Whether it is usable for this product, maybe @wigglyamp knows?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Probably the only area of CS-STAN that would apply to the Aerovonics AV20 would be the approval of an AOA system.

Standard Change CS-SC251b
INSTALLATION OF AN ANGLE OF ATTACK (AOA) INDICATOR SYSTEM

However, this SC doesn’t allow installation without a Form 1 (unlike CS-SC-015b which allows Flarm to be installed without a Form 1) so this will be an issue unless you can get a new 8130-3 with the part.

Avionics geek.
Fairoaks. EGTF

Interesting…

Given this

it doesn’t look like an 8130-3 will be supplied right now.

But does anything prevent an 8130-3 being issued for an uncertified part? It would be highly unusual, but all the form states is that the item is what it is. AFAICT nothing prevents an FAA145 company from issuing the form for a pack of bog rolls. And exactly the same for an EASA145 company and an EASA-1 form. The issuer needs to be authorised to issue it for the stated part.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

wigglyamp wrote:

However, this SC doesn’t allow installation without a Form 1 (unlike CS-SC-015b which allows Flarm to be installed without a Form 1) so this will be an issue unless you can get a new 8130-3 with the part.

Could one get round that with 21.A.307(c)?

A part or appliance shall be eligible for installation in a type-certificated product when it is in a condition for safe operation, and it is:
(c) in the case of ELA1 or ELA2 aircraft, a part or appliance that is:
1. not life-limited, nor part of the primary structure, nor part of the flight controls;
2. manufactured in conformity to applicable design;
3. marked in accordance with Subpart Q;
4. identified for installation in the specific aircraft;
5. to be installed in an aircraft for which the owner has verified compliance with the conditions 1 through 4 and has accepted responsibility for this compliance

Despite nearly 200k posts to date, this rang a bell, and a search here using the term

“21.A.307(c)”

digs out numerous previous discussions, most of them inconclusive, some of them aggressive, some involving goalposts travelling at the speed of an SR71, and it is obvious that this route is, shall we say, rather controverial in the trade

This post by me picks up one aspect which suggests this concession may have been intended only to facilitate the installation of “trivia” (e.g. spark plugs) most of which are within pilot maintenance privileges anyway! Not a piece of avionics, certified or uncertified.

OTOH restrictive regulations must be read as they are written, not between the lines, and in any robust justice system any ambiguity must be construed against the party that seeks to enforce them

Taking the clause

manufactured in conformity to applicable design;

presumably, since nobody is going to sell stuff which doesn’t comply with the design this must mean a Certificate of Conformity needs to be obtained?

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom
7 Posts
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