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Piper Malibu PA46 N757NY down in Goose Bay.

Looks like N757NY. Pilot survived, but passenger did not. He was a UK resident – the new owner along for the ride? RIP, very sad.

Malibu

Registered to the trust commonly used in Europe (or at least the UK) for N reg ownership, so quite likely. From the reports on the weather conditions of the rescue effort, and from the track which showed them staying quite low after departure, there will be some learning points…

EGTF, LFTF

denopa wrote:

Registered to the trust commonly used in Europe (or at least the UK) for N reg ownership, so quite likely. From the reports on the weather conditions of the rescue effort, and from the track which showed them staying quite low after departure, there will be some learning points…

Yes, it is an unforgiving part of the world in poor weather. The weather was very bad according to the news articles.

EGTK Oxford

Doesn’t “everyone know” that if the weather is bad, or forecast to be bad, in the Arctic, you just don’t go?

I once sat for four days in Resolute Bay just twiddling my thumbs because the forecast wasn’t great.

EGKB Biggin Hill

denopa wrote:

From the reports on the weather conditions of the rescue effort, and from the track which showed them staying quite low after departure, there will be some learning points…

Thought the same after reading the report. Why take off into a blizzard ??

172driver wrote:

Thought the same after reading the report. Why take off into a blizzard ??

Particularly in a Malibu which could climb through it. You either depart planning to climb on top, or you stay put. Flying along at 2000ft is stupid particularly as you won’t have planned that (hence presumably the CFIT). I bet they thought they were flying out over the water so stay low until the weather improves. They just ignored the hill between them and Greenland.

Last Edited by JasonC at 03 May 15:47
EGTK Oxford

Timothy wrote:

Doesn’t “everyone know” that if the weather is bad, or forecast to be bad, in the Arctic, you just don’t go?

I can’t understand that. Even in the “easier” parts of the world I always say the passengers to be flexible for departure/return due to weather with possibility that we’re flying few days before or after planned dates. No way I would allow peer pressure to force me to depart in weather conditions that I’m not sure that the aircraft is capable of flying in.

LDZA LDVA, Croatia

Emir wrote:

I can’t understand that.

Um, what don’t you understand? That I make a special case of the Arctic? If so, the reasons are several-fold:

  1. The weather changes much more rapidly and unpredictably in the Arctic
  2. When the weather is bad, it can be very, very bad
  3. The distance to alternates can be much greater (when I did the Pole, my alternate was another 600nm; that sharpens the reflexes!)
  4. Search and Rescue, if you do go down, is much harder and more dangerous (as this episode shows)
  5. Survival after a forced landing is less likely (as this episode shows)
  6. Equipment in the aircraft is much closer to the edge of its capability
  7. etc
EGKB Biggin Hill

JasonC wrote:

You either depart planning to climb on top, or you stay put. Flying along at 2000ft is stupid particularly as you won’t have planned that (hence presumably the CFIT). I bet they thought they were flying out over the water so stay low until the weather improves. They just ignored the hill between them and Greenland.

Don’t look much in details but at some point they need to get above +8000ft MSAs better sooner than later?

ESSEX, United Kingdom

Timothy wrote:

Um, what don’t you understand? That I make a special case of the Arctic? If so, the reasons are several-fold:

He meant he can’t understand why they went.

EGTK Oxford
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