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Process of purchasing an aircraft located in another EU country

Now 2 and a half months in, I’m starting to reconsider whether a reg change is necessary. I completed the ownership transfer with no issues, so I’m the official registered owner with the Romanian CAA. Transferring to PH is 2.5k for no apparent gain in utility or reduction in headache. It’s my understanding that ARC renewal and annual inspections can be done anywhere in EASA-land, right? If the only gain is some theoretical resale value in the future, doesn’t it make more sense just to cross that bridge at that point?

Also, everywhere I go it’s a bit of a novelty. People are constantly interested in a guy with a US passport flying a Romanian aircraft in Northern Europe!

EHRD, Netherlands

dutch_flyer wrote:

Transferring to PH is 2.5k for no apparent gain in utility or reduction in headache.

How do you assemble that number? I was told PH-Reg was expensive, but that’s a bit over the top tbh.

dutch_flyer wrote:

It’s my understanding that ARC renewal and annual inspections can be done anywhere in EASA-land, right?

Correct.

mh
Aufwind GmbH
EKPB, Germany

It’s a quote for the ARC inspection plus the transfer.

EHRD, Netherlands

You are right, under EASA there is no apparent gain to do that, unless Romania has some home made rulings which make ownership more difficult, such as that they want to see the airplane regularly or so. Generally this should not be the case anyway as EASA does not encourage gold plating, but that is the only thing I might think of.

dutch_flyer wrote:

Also, everywhere I go it’s a bit of a novelty.

Why not paint a small Dracula somewhere onto it and leave it as it is.

Summat like this?
https://www.123rf.com/photo_135949857_flying-bat-with-vampire-teeth-watercolor-illustration.html

LSZH, Switzerland

Mooney_Driver wrote:

Why not paint a small Dracula somewhere onto it and leave it as it is.

You may be onto something there…

EHRD, Netherlands

In an EASA to EASA change of registry, there is no need for a new ARC. The present one stays valid and the new competent authority edits the registration and certifies it using a stamp and signature on the original document.

Airline/Mentor/Safety/Instructor - Pilot
Based Austria | Operating Worldwide

Snoopy wrote:

In an EASA to EASA change of registry, there is no need for a new ARC. The present one stays valid and the new competent authority edits the registration and certifies it using a stamp and signature on the original document.

Where’s the facepalm emoji when you need it? How is it possible to get such different answers from people. Is there a regulation published somewhere I can refer to on this?

EHRD, Netherlands

I will refrain about commenting on “people”, but I agree the facepalm emoji is adequate.
Instead I’ll try and stand out and give you this:

ML.A.905 Transfer of aircraft registration within the Union
Regulation (EU) 2019/1383

(a) When transferring an aircraft registration within the Union, the applicant shall:

(1) first, provide the former Member State with the name of the Member State in which the aircraft will be registered;

(2) and subsequently apply to the new Member State for the issuance of a new airworthiness certificate in accordance with Annex I (Part-21) to Regulation (EU) No 748/2012.

(b) Notwithstanding point (a)(3) of point ML.A.902, the former ARC shall remain valid until its expiry date, except when the ARC was issued by independent certifying staff holding a national certifying-staff qualification in accordance with point (b)(4) of point ML.A.901, in which case point ML.A.906 shall apply.

(c) Notwithstanding points (a) and (b), in those cases where the aircraft was in a non-airworthy condition in the former Member State or where the airworthiness status of the aircraft cannot be determined using the existing records, point ML.A.906 shall apply

Last Edited by Snoopy at 11 May 20:49
Airline/Mentor/Safety/Instructor - Pilot
Based Austria | Operating Worldwide

How is it possible to get such different answers from people

Because there are variations in practice.

For example one guy transferred his plane from one EASA reg to another and the accepting authority checked the paperwork rather more carefully than he expected and they found something which at least halved the value of his plane. He found a workaround and fairly promptly sold the plane.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

they found something which at least halved the value of his plane

What did they find?

EHRD, Netherlands
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