Menu Sign In Contact FAQ
Banner
Welcome to our forums

Sitting the CBIR written exams

Hello all.
I’m new at Euroga so thanks in advance for your indulgence in case my question was already answered by someone, though I couldn’t find anything. I’m currently preparing for the 7 CBIR exams after having passed the EASA PPL recently. I should add for completeness that I received an FAA CPL-IR in 1979 but did not fly (regretfully) ever since. Being retired now at age 60 I decided to pick up flying again. I also got the FAA licence revalidated although without the IR for the moment.
Now to the question : I noticed there is almost no infirmation at all on the conditions to sit the 7 CBIR exams i.e. how many questions and how much time available to answer them for each subject. From the very few posts I found on internet all were from UK. To my amazement it looks like (from those reports) that one has the choice of spreading those exams over an undefined period ( correct me if I’m wrong). Also, it seems that the number of questions and time allowed varies from what I’m doing (in Luxembourg using Petersoftware/Boeing from Germany). From the information I currently have the exams have to be done within a couple of days (though I did not ask our CAA yet) and are set up as follows :
Air Law- 45 minutes – 30 questions
Instrumentation – 30 minutes – 20 questions
Flight Planning – 1H30 – 33 questions
Human Performance – 45 minutes – 30 questions
Meteorology – 1H30 – 63 questions
Radio Navigation – 1 H – 34 questions
Communication – 30 minutes -30 questions
I’d be grateful to hear if this is different in the various EASA countries or asked the other way around, shouldn’t this be one single standard ?
Thanks.

Last Edited by gildnn at 27 Mar 19:57
EDRT, ELLX, Luxembourg

gildnn wrote:

I’d be grateful to hear if this is different in the various EASA countries or asked the other way around, shouldn’t this be one single standard

When it comes to “spreading” the exams, the rules are written so that each individual country have considerably freedom in deciding how much they can be spread.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

Hi,

I just have finished my CBIR theoretical exams in the Netherlands. I’ve done my first exams in August last year, and the last exam in March this year. So no need to do it in a couple of days. In total, I visited the CBR in Utrecht 4 times in 4 months to do the 7 exams. It’s definitely possible to do it quicker, but it all depends on your private life and the amount of time you’re able to spend on the question database….

It seems that the times that you mentioned per subject are taken from the IR course. Note there’s a significant difference between the IR and the EIR/CBIR in learning objectives. This means that the number of potential questions is limited for the latter, but also the number of questions in the exam and the time that you’re allowed to spend during the exam. Here you can find the time that you’re allowed per exam (from the Dutch agency): https://cbr.nl/download/planning%20Luchtvaartexamens%20tm%20maart%202017.pdf

I found AviationExam invaluable for the preparation. With AE, you can practice all questions based on the actual Learning Objectives. Despite the fact that the questions are being renewed at the moment, this tool gives you a good preparation for the actual exams in my opinion. With AE, you can practice exams as well, which gives you the exact amount of questions and you’re expected to answer these questions within the timeframe of the actual exam.

Good luck with your study…

Last Edited by hfl at 27 Mar 21:00
hfl
EHLE, Netherlands

gildnn wrote:

I should add for completeness that I received an FAA CPL-IR in 1979 but did not fly (regretfully) ever since. Being retired now at age 60 I decided to pick up flying again. I also got the FAA licence revalidated although without the IR for the moment.

Have you given any consideration at all to not going for the CB-IR and instead doing an FAA Instrument Proficiency Check after some re-training? IIRC the FAA IR does not expire unlike the EASA one. Once you have 50 hrs of PIC time IFR you can do the skill test to get the EASA IR. That would save you sitting the EASA exams.

Of course having been away from flying for so long, you would need to read up on instrument flying anyway, and receive some practical training, but going this route could be more painless.

Another issue is that you may no longer have your US certificate, or not have the plastic certificate, so you would need to go through the process of having a new one issued, and pass the US Class 3 medical.

LFPT, LFPN

Thank you Gents for your feedback so far.
I didn’t realize that nations had so much freedom in organizing and setting the exam conditions.
@ aviathor : yes I did consider this option but unfortunately the main condition you mention i.e. the IFR hours as POC are missing, in fact after I passed the FAA IR and did not fly a single hour as POC under IFR.
I’m feeling like a complete rookie in that redpect and for the sake of safety I think I must go through the complete programme anyway. But thanks for the hint.

EDRT, ELLX, Luxembourg

If you are able to “re-activate” your FAA license and IR, get some refresher training and build up 50 hrs PIC under IFR, the conversion route is still available to you, at least if you can complete by say May 2019.

LFPT, LFPN

In France you have 18 months to obtain the 7 certificates from your inscription to the “theorical Ato” (the only one up to date is Mermoz Institute in Rungis.

Each certificate can be attempted 4 times, for a total maximum of 6 or 8 sessions to obtain all 7 certificates.

I don’t remember number of Q’s and time for each certificate but that’s less than you say.
For communications and human performance it is 20 minutes for 12 questions.
Meteorology is 50 minutes for about 37 questions.

Last Edited by jeff64 at 28 Mar 05:28
LFBZ LFBP, France

Hmmm, yes, if this was me I would also try to regain the FAA CPL/IR and then do the CB IR on the back of that.

No exams at all that way I did the JAA IR conversion exams in 2011 and didn’t find them easy, especially as the content was mostly irrelevant to flying.

However I wonder if a European FTO could veto the conversion, on the basis that you didn’t have enough recent flying time. The fact that you passed the FAA BFR and IPC isn’t likely to affect this view…

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Thanks for your view Peter. I actually had about 40 flying hours to do the conversion FAA CPL to EASA PPL (2015-2017) but all of them were with instructor. I needed those to be able to a) pass the FAA BFR and b) pass the EASA skill test. This said I’m not sure which route would take longer as I would have to spend considerable time in the US to build up the IFR hours as PIC plus the fact that I would never pass the FAA IR review at this stage without further instruction.

EDRT, ELLX, Luxembourg

Where are you based? You could use a FAA instructor in Europe to do your IPC, no? You could even do at the ATO that would take care of preparing you for the EASA test, all in one go. They would train you for the EASA tests, which should allow you to pass your IPC then immediately after passing the EASA test (conversion).

Last Edited by Noe at 28 Mar 08:29
25 Posts
Sign in to add your message

Back to Top