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61.75 and High Performance Endorsement

hello,
i have a uk easa ppl with complex rating
i also have a faa 61.75 ppl does my complex rating (logbook entry) equal the FAA High Performance Endorsement or do I need a 2nd/new logbook entry for so called FAA
High Performance Aircraft (more than 200HP etc.)

as always thanks for your help

fly2000

An EASA endorsement is not relevant to your FAA certificate. The FAA has a complex (ie retractable etc) endorsement and a HP endorsement (powerful aircraft). This would have to be signed off by an FAA CFI.

EGTK Oxford

1) EASA doesn’t have any complex rating. EASA knows complex aircraft, complex maintenance tasks and complex regulations. But no complex rating.

2) Compex and HPA are different things (both in FAA land and in EASA land). One doesn’t have any bearing on the other.

Simple answer: You need an endorsement for FAA HPA. And also for FAA complex if you don’t already have it.

It might be possible to get your complex endorsement from your instructor for EASA SEP with variable pitch propeller and SEP with retractable landing gear variants.

Last Edited by Martin at 29 Apr 16:20

I have a 61.75 and dozens of hours of (FAA) complex / high performance / tailwheel. Do I need (thinking mostly insurance purposes) to have these endorsements “signed” into my logbook by an FAA instructor, in order to fly these types on my 61.75 privileges?

My understanding is that the instructor who provides the endorsement required by

§61.31 Type rating requirements, additional training, and authorization requirements.

(e) Additional training required for operating complex airplanes. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (e)(2) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of a complex airplane, unless the person has—
(i) Received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized instructor in a complex airplane, or in a full flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a complex airplane, and has been found proficient in the operation and systems of the airplane; and
(ii) Received a one-time endorsement in the pilot’s logbook from an authorized instructor who certifies the person is proficient to operate a complex airplane.
(2) The training and endorsement required by paragraph (e)(1) of this section is not required if the person has logged flight time as pilot in command of a complex airplane, or in a flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a complex airplane prior to August 4, 1997.

or
(f) Additional training required for operating high-performance airplanes. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (f)(2) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of a high-performance airplane (an airplane with an engine of more than 200 horsepower), unless the person has—
(i) Received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized instructor in a high-performance airplane, or in a full flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a high-performance airplane, and has been found proficient in the operation and systems of the airplane; and
(ii) Received a one-time endorsement in the pilot’s logbook from an authorized instructor who certifies the person is proficient to operate a high-performance airplane.
(2) The training and endorsement required by paragraph (f)(1) of this section is not required if the person has logged flight time as pilot in command of a high-performance airplane, or in a flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a high-performance airplane prior to August 4, 1997.

or

(i) Additional training required for operating tailwheel airplanes. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (i)(2) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of a tailwheel airplane unless that person has received and logged flight training from an authorized instructor in a tailwheel airplane
and received an endorsement in the person’s logbook from an authorized instructor who found the person proficient in the operation of a tailwheel airplane. The flight training must include at least the following maneuvers and procedures:
(i) Normal and crosswind takeoffs and landings;
(ii) Wheel landings (unless the manufacturer has recommended against such landings); and
(iii) Go-around procedures.
(2) The training and endorsement required by paragraph (i)(1) of this section is not required if the person logged pilot-in-command time in a tailwheel airplane before April 15, 1991.

Sec. 61.41 Flight training received from flight instructors not certificated by the FAA restricts what a foreign flight instructor is authorized to endorse to only show training given and my understanding is this does not include certification entries that the pilot is found proficient to operate a complex, high performance, or tail wheel aircraft.

(a) A person may credit flight training toward the requirements of a pilot certificate or rating issued under this part, if that person received the training from:
(1) A flight instructor of an Armed Force in a program for training military pilots of either—
(i) The United States; or
(ii) A foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation.
(2) A flight instructor who is authorized to give such training by the licensing authority of a foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, and the flight training is given outside the United States.
(b) A flight instructor described in paragraph (a) of this section is only authorized to give endorsements to show training given.

The only exception is that you are grandfather’ed like I am and don’t require the endorsement.

Last Edited by NCYankee at 11 Feb 16:18
KUZA

I think you will need CFI signature for all of them in the US, if you find the right guy you can bundle all of them with area familiarization and rental checkout, tough will be hard to find a RG & TW

I can see how one can get off the hook on previous tail-wheel experience on a 61.75 but I don’t think that will apply to complex/high performance types as they have different definitions in EASA vs FAA, especially when flying outside the US…

ESSEX, United Kingdom

To ce clear I have some of the equivalent (minus high performance) endorsements with EASA instructors.

To be safe I’m planning to get the complex signed out by an FAA FII when I do my EASA MEP/IR revalidation (I think technically it’s variable pitch even though it’s the computer who manages the blue lever), but I have some more flights in an N- SR22 (outside the UK, so flying on my FAA privileges), and I’m worried about potential insurance issues.

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