Menu Sign In Contact FAQ
Banner
Welcome to our forums

Trip Report: Turweston EGBT - Welshpool EGCW - Old Buckhenham EGSV

10 Posts

This is a brief report of a lovely trip I went along with yesterday as a co-pilot to another time-builder in my club. It turned out to be long enough to be the qualifying CPL cross country which requires a trip of 300 NM with landings at 2 aerodromes other than the departure aerodrome. For me, even though I did not log any hours it was a great experience and a fun way to spend a free Sunday doing what I love most!

Side note: It does not say anywhere that the 300NM x-country has to be a round trip. I did my qualifying CPL cross-country almost by chance and without knowing until after it was done in the Summer of 2017 when I flew Jerez LEJR to Melilla GEML and on the return leg landed, almost unintentionally, in Trebujena LETJ because the aircraft had to go to maintenance there (otherwise would have flown back to LEJR where my car was…)

It is very nice to do these “longer” cross-country flights with another pilot as sharing the workload helps reduce stress and make the whole trip much more enjoyable. In this case, I did the radios and assisted with navigation, bringing up plates and briefing procedures as well as other stuff on the ground which helps gets the flight rolling (so while one pilot is doing the A check the other is calling for PPRs or fuel, checking weather etc.). There are other perks to flying with another pilot, like being able to grab take away cups of tea; and I would hold them until established in the cruise. Then co-pilot becomes “auto-pilot” and P1 can enjoy his tea :)

This flight started the night before when checking the weather for Sunday. It seemed clear in South-East England with weather approaching from the North-West through Wales/Liverpool. The idea of flying into the wind seemed sensible as one would see the bad weather coming and could just turn around any time if it deteriorated below reasonable limits, with a nice tailwind to fly back home.

The morning of the flight weather seemed OK to fly towards Snowdonia, with a call to Caernarfon EGCK quickly dismissing this idea as the local FISO adviced us against it due to strong crosswinds (30 knots straight across the runway). The next idea, Dunkeswell EGTU, was binned due to their runway being closed because of snow. Welshpool EGCW on the other hand welcomed us to go there as they had nice weather. So off we went with full tanks on our PA28-161!

The first leg, Turweston to Welshpool, took us through the Birmingham Class D. A call was made well in advance and a traffic service with zone transit was provided. Very smooth flight at 4000 ft with a 15 to 25 kt headwind. Skies were clear until reaching the Wales first mountains but by that time we’d begin our descent to land.

City and airport of Birmingham to our right:

Welshpool is an airfield that is difficult to spot as it is hidden between two hills. Even though our SkyDemon was telling us it was right in front of us, we couldn’t see it. We turned to a left downwind for runway 22 without seeing it and only then made visual contact with the narrow but long runway.

On the ground at Welshpool:

Because of the “deteriorating” weather at Welshpool, it was decided to land, pay, use the Gent’s room, and fly off. I suggested to fly to Old Buckenham which would only take about an hour and a half given the tailwind. Green light was given and off we went to EGSV!

A straight line from EGCW to EGSV would take us through the Birmingham CAS. I requested a zone transit but was sadly refused one (remain outside controlled airspace, the four least comforting words in the English language…). So we flew North of Birmingham at 4000 ft. A Thompson 757 flew right above us very closely, and once he cleared us he was given a descent to a lower altitude, so it was clearly us that prevented him from going lower. It somehow makes you feel “important” when your mere “existence” in a small airplane is having an impact on the airliners :)

East Midlands did let us go through their Class D not above 4000 ft. This only saved us a few miles as we just cut a corner of their airspace (good for RT practice anyway). They gave us a traffic service too, and advised us to look out due to multiple contacts in the Leicester area, presumably in the circuit well below us…
After talking to East Midlands we tried the Marham and Lakenheath MATZs (closed on Sundays) and finally obtained a traffic service from Norwich Radar. We dropped Norwich about 10 minutes before reaching Old Buckenham, flying straight into the right downwind for runway 25.

Old Buckenham had a very nice café in which we enjoyed a well deserved Sunday Roast (7.95 GBP, great value!) while planning the final leg:

Old Buckenham radio:

On departure from Old Buckenham we did a short field take-off technique (2 stages of flap on a PA28) and the plane just flies itself off at 60 kt. The sun was getting low on the horizon and at that time there was nobody else flying around us at 4000 ft. We first talked to Norwich (traffic service) and once we left their coverage behind, the only one we could talk to was London Information which basically just give you a QNH setting and advise you to remain outside controlled airspace (the four least comforting words in the English language, again!)

Bedford aerodrome. You can clearly discern the original runways which are now mostly huge car parks (is this where they stock up on cars for Brexit? haha):

Short final at Turweston runway 27:

Some FR24 tracks:

EGBT to EGCW:

EGCW to EGSV:

EGSV to EGBT:

Each flight took approximately 1:30h block time. All in all, an excellent flying day!

Turweston EGBT, Jerez LEJR, United Kingdom

Well done, I like those unpretentious small VFR trip reports.

And yes, sometimes it is just as good (or even better) to just be along for the ride, taking pictures and enjoying the countryside, without having any responsibility (and expense!)…

Frankfurt (EDFZ, EDFE), Germany

boscomantico wrote:

I like those unpretentious small VFR trip reports

Come on, it is the CPL qualifying XCTRY NAV

Nice pictures with 100km visibility !

Last Edited by Ibra at 04 Feb 18:59
ESSEX, United Kingdom

I am humbled by the other trip reports of people flying 10 hours across Europe, the Atlantic, Africa etc. So yes, not trying to be pretentious at all, just sharing my experience as a “modest” time builder, haha.

One day though… one day!

boscomantico wrote:

sometimes it is just as good (or even better) to just be along for the ride, taking pictures and enjoying the countryside, without having any responsibility (and expense!)…

Exactly! These hours are very good flight experience.

Although I must confess back when I was doing my PPL training I went along with a low hour PPL (he had just gotten his and was time building, but hadn’t flown for a year or so), and honest to God I did way more work than he did! He couldn’t find his way around a circuit anymore, completely lost!

Turweston EGBT, Jerez LEJR, United Kingdom

Great report Alpha_Floor and thank you for posting it

It is super to have trip reports like this, since this sort of flying is so much more achievable by most people.

Very few people do 10hrs; it is impossible in nearly all GA types (without a ferry tank). I’ve done almost 8, in very unusual situations with strong headwind but having a very accurate fuel computer and good weather at all alternates prior to the destination. But as I say this is really rare.

Indeed there is no requirement for a circular flight for the CPL and, perhaps more controversially, there is no reg saying you cannot stop and sleep, and this means the requirement can be met on a normal journey across Europe which may people have in their logbook anyway.

Welshpool was my most visited airport at one point. Probably since overtaken by Le Touquet or some other watering hole. Turweston I vaguely remember…

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Very nice indeed, thanks for posting!

LFHN - Bellegarde - Vouvray France

Alpha_Floor wrote:

On departure from Old Buckenham we did a short field take-off technique (2 stages of flap on a PA28) and the plane just flies itself off at 60 kt.

60 kt is higher than the take-off speed without flaps. If you need a short field take-off then you should make a positive rotation at the speed given in the POH. For an Archer at MTOM it is 49 knots… It might differ slightly for your Warrior.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

Airborne_Again wrote:

60 kt is higher than the take-off speed without flaps. If you need a short field take-off then you should make a positive rotation at the speed given in the POH

You’re right. I think I meant to say 50, not 60.

Just checked the POH:
- Flaps to 25 degrees
- Full power before brake release
- Accelerate to 40-52 KIAS (depending on weight) and rotate
- Accelerate to and maintain 44-57 KIAS until obstacles cleared
- Accelerate to 79 KIAS and retract the flaps

Turweston EGBT, Jerez LEJR, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

Great report Alpha_Floor and thank you for posting it

It is super to have trip reports like this, since this sort of flying is so much more achievable by most people.

Thank you! I will try to do more of these. Naturally it’s easier to take pictures when one is “riding along” rather than PIC. Or if you’ve got a decent equipment with an AP. :)

Peter wrote:

Very few people do 10hrs

Yeah, that was more of an exaggeration really :D

Peter wrote:

Welshpool was my most visited airport at one point. Probably since overtaken by Le Touquet or some other watering hole. Turweston I vaguely remember…

Well if you happen to fly to Turweston let me know and I will gladly buy you a coffee!

Turweston EGBT, Jerez LEJR, United Kingdom

CPL cross country flight requirements moved here

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom
10 Posts
Sign in to add your message

Back to Top