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What is the best non-EASA tourer for NPPL use and maybe not needing the permits?

With regard to considerations such as this which in April 2018 will affect a large number of UK pilots who currently fly certified aircraft, what would people suggest?

It seems to me that the RV range stands out by a big margin…

  • decent performance
  • normal low speed handling
  • good runway versatility
  • approvable for IFR, and actually suitable for IMC due to being all-metal

It goes without saying that it needs to be available ready built

I posted this Q here in Non Certified (loosely meaning “no ICAO CofA”) but maybe it isn’t quite so simple. This thread on what exactly is non EASA suggests there may be “non EASA” types which do have an ICAO CofA and thus don’t require the various permits. Certainly if “non EASA” meant “not having an EASA CofA” then there will be types which can fly freely anywhere in Europe.

Pilots flying such a type on the NPPL would still be limited to UK only, unless they get an EASA medical in which case AFAIK France accepts the NPPL also. Beyond that, you would need somebody with the full PPL and then the permit Q would come in, but I suspect this is a flexibility which most would be quite keen to have.

I am aware that there are several countries in Europe where “homebuilts” can fly freely, and there are other countries which have no known regs against it (so it is legal), so let’s not start that business again because it has been done to death (well, to the extent that anybody can find and quote the regs) it isn’t useful unless you fly only in those regions.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

It seems to me that the RV range stands out by a big margin…

No question about it. You can also add that there are lots of them, they use Lycoming (or clone), simple and traditional design, all metal. This means it’s straight forward for any mechanic used to a traditional certified GA airplane to work on it. You can call or mail the factory for any problem or question, they always answer. Great online community, with very knowledgeable people.

It’s phenomenal performance. It’s one of the very few GA aircraft (except most modern microlights) where top speed (not Vne by the way) => 4*Vs
Take off and lands in less than 200 m, climbs at around 2000 ft/min, cruises at 170-180 knots. Most of them are aerobatic.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

If IFR stability were a priority, along with efficiency, and aerobatics not a priority, I’d suggest the best solution would be a Vans RV-9A with a fuel injected Lycoming IO-320, 160 HP or similar clone. Autopilots are being fitted to many of them. Range might be an issue depending on need.

Last Edited by Silvaire at 21 Jul 16:53

I guess this question was just too obscure

An aircraft

  • with an ICAO CofA (thus doesn’t need the various permits around Europe) and
  • which is a non-EASA aircraft (thus can be flown on the NPPL after April 2018).

Something like an RV, Lancair, etc, can be flown UK to France AFAIK without any permit but only if the NPPL holder has the full CAA Class 2 medical, which defeats the point of the NPPL.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

That’s an interestingly tight Venn disagram of aircraft types I have no current listing of ‘EASA aircraft’ but it stands to reason that an FAA/ICAO certified aircraft that was never marketed in Europe might avoid EASA’s list.

An owner posting recently claimed the Meyers 200 is an ‘EASA aircraft’, and if so that one is out. Too bad.

A Navion Rangemaster would do Peter’s mission very well, although I see some 1960s images on-line with D-registration. Not sure it avoids EASA’s list.

A highly STC-modified Globe/Temco Swift or a Micco SP-20 might be good if you needed only two seats.

I imagine anything certified pre-WWII wouldn’t make EASA’s list, but they are all normal category in the US. ‘Antiquey’ choices might be: Beech Staggerwing, Stinson Reliant, Howard DGA etc.

Last Edited by Silvaire at 27 Jul 20:54

Weren’t there some “common” types which could go on Annex 2 in the UK? I have a very vague recollection that some ex-mil ones could, and even one very similar to a PA28.

There were definitely types which could exist on Annex 2 and CofA concurrently, though obviously not the same aircraft and as a revenue preservation measure the UK CAA would not allow the CofA type to be moved to Annex 2 (only vice versa was allowed).

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

There were definitely types which could exist on Annex 2 and CofA concurrently, though obviously not the same aircraft

Bulldog, made initially at Shoreham

Last Edited by Silvaire at 27 Jul 21:00

Bolkow 207 maybe?

Edit – 207 is the four seater.

Last Edited by WilliamF at 28 Jul 08:58
Buying, Selling, Flying
EIBR, Ireland

Silvaire wrote:

That’s an interestingly tight Venn disagram of aircraft types

Indeed. Maybe one single type exists ? NPPL is a pure British phenomenon also I understand, so it also involves a very tight diagram of pilots.
ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

Peter wrote:

Weren’t there some “common” types which could go on Annex 2 in the UK?

The Piper Apache is non-EASA.

Andreas IOM
17 Posts
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