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Expired EASA IR - best procedure to renew/revalidate?

Mine expired at the end of 2014, I think.

The examiner I used sent me this

which I had not seen before, especially the bit (iv) about having to do all the training again if it is expired by more than 3 years!

But even option (iii) is an ATO money making opportunity, without any defined syllabus or competence and therefore can be stretched to any point.

I know one had to do everything again (including the exams) if the IR expired by more than 7 years.

But… isn’t the ICAO IR to CB IR conversion the better way to do this? An oral exam with the examiner and a checkride. This seems too obvious – what is the catch?

Obviously my FAA IR is current etc.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

This is only a recommendation.

The DEFINITIVE part is “The amount of refresher training should be determined on a case-by-case basis by the ATO, taking into account…”

And the first thing to take into account is “(1) the experience of the applicant”. Which includes recent experience using another IR.

As far as the stuff highlighted is concerned, it is preceded by “…. the following items can be taken into consideration”.

The only mandatory items are that the ATO has to determine the training needs, train accordingly (which may be zero) and then issue a course completion certificate.

C.

Biggin Hill

You are looking for FCL.625.

Quote
(iii) expiry for longer than 1 year but shorter than 7 years: a minimum of three training
sessions;

Last Edited by NorFlyer at 10 Apr 10:55
Norway, where a gallon of avgas is ch...
ENEG

Peter wrote:

But… isn’t the ICAO IR to CB IR conversion the better way to do this?

Yes, for you who has more than 100 hours IFR in your logbook, the CBIR should be an easy and painless route (and your best option) to getting an EASA IR again. The fact that EASA gives you way more credit for an FAA rating than for an expired EASA rating goes to show how much they value their own training routes.

Last Edited by Rwy20 at 10 Apr 11:09

IMHO, the CBIR conversion route can only be used for the issuance of an EASA IR. It can not be used for revalidating a lapsed EASA IR.

Mainz (EDFZ), Germany

Can you renounce at a rating?

In addition, if those pilots who held an (elapsed) EASA rating were treated worse than those with no rating at all, that would raise fundamental legal questions as to the equality under the law (don’t know the exact term here).

IMHO, the CBIR conversion route can only be used for the issuance of an EASA IR. It can not be used for revalidating a lapsed EASA IR.

This supposed limitation on the use of the CB IR has never come up before e.g. here here here and other places where the 7 year exam expiry came up in connection with the CB IR “solution” – when there was the opportunity for someone to raise it.

It would be great to see a reference.

Logically, what if someone had a UK/etc IR which expired 30 years ago. That would mean they would be prohibited from doing the CB IR.

But Cobalt has a point. The renewal might be “easier” (in some way) than the CB IR. The problem with the ATO route is that the plane has to be put on the ATO’s approved list, and I know from experience most ATOs won’t touch a customer plane, especially an N-reg, with a bargepole.

In addition, if those pilots who held an (elapsed) EASA rating were treated worse than those with no rating at all, that would raise fundamental legal questions as to the equality under the law (don’t know the exact term here).

Welcome to aviation

Probably there was politics involved. In any regulation, somebody is making money, so the Q to ask is “who stands to gain?”. The FTOs, for a start.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

I have found out that this process is much simpler than anybody expected – if you have a currently valid ICAO IR. I will post more details when I am done

But I can see it will depend hugely on knowing the right person.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom
8 Posts
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