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ANY installed transponder must be turned ON

From here

Peter wrote:

by turning it off

That is not allowed. If the aircraft has a transponder installed, it shall be turned on at every flight, no matter CAS or not. Not doing so is just as illegal as busting airspace. That, at least, is the Norwegian airspace regulations.

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

LeSving wrote:

That is not allowed. If the aircraft has a transponder installed, it shall be turned on at every flight, no matter CAS or not. Not doing so is just as illegal as busting airspace. That, at least, is the Norwegian airspace regulations.

As long as it is allowed to fly OCAS without carrying a transponder it is unrealistic to expect to catch someone who does have a transponder but chooses to turn it off.

Anyway, if someone wants not to be seen, would they care?

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

It’s really interesting Norway has a law which mandates TXP=ON if installed. I have never heard of such a thing, but then Norway can probably regulate things more easily, and get a higher level of compliance, than most places.

As long as it is allowed to fly OCAS without carrying a transponder it is unrealistic to expect to catch someone who does have a transponder but chooses to turn it off.
Anyway, if someone wants not to be seen, would they care?

Very true, but it’s all a matter of degree. All the time it is legal to fly non-TXP, the incentive to install one and switch it on remains firmly at zero. For most people, even most of those who have had very near misses – due to the lack of awareness of the technology, and the cost of present solutions.

Once you make something mandatory, the incentive gets lifted up, quite a bit in the generally law-aware GA community. Sure, those who want to be invisible because they are illegal will remain so but I am certain their % is very small on the landscape of mid-air probability. Those who are non-TXP due to “civil liberties” or because their encoder is broken will think twice, IMHO.

Also, Norway reportedly has a straight ban on N-regs (and probably other similar permutations) so there won’t be much incentive to fly below the radar. Also flying literally below the radar there is probably unwise, especially in IMC

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

The USA also has a rule that if a transponder is installed, it must be turned on (in class E and higher airspace, but since class E usually goes down to 700 feet AGL over any airfield with an instrument approach, in other words, pretty much any public use airfield – essentially if you want to go anywhere and have a TXP, it must be on).

Since I used to live there, I’m in the habit of turning mine on before entering the runway.

Andreas IOM

Peter wrote:

Also, Norway reportedly has a straight ban on N-regs (and probably other similar permutations)

This is not the case. Several N- regs based at my home airport. I know what the regs say, but it is not practiced. They seem to “forget” when you pay the bribe fee.

Norway, where a gallon of avgas is ch...
ENEG

Peter wrote:

It’s really interesting Norway has a law which mandates TXP=ON if installed. I have never heard of such a thing, but then Norway can probably regulate things more easily, and get a higher level of compliance, than most places.

Sweden has the same rule in AIP. However, AIP is not law.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

AIP ENR 1.6-2.1.1

AIP is not law, but the law say that AIP shall be followed.

I wonder about that regulation, why have it. I didn’t know about it until a year or so ago. I never bothered putting the transponder on when flying entirely outside CAS. I do now however, after someone mentioned this to me.

Maybe one reason is that IFR in G is allowed and is used all the time ?

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

Peter wrote:

Also, Norway reportedly has a straight ban on N-regs

It’s not a straight ban. The law say that foreign registered airplanes can be here according to however LT chooses to administer these foreign aircraft.

They have chosen to allow them to stay for 6 months, max 12. I also know of a few N-regs around. I have no idea how they manage to keep them here. Maybe they have them here only parts of the year?

ENVA ENOP ENMO, Norway

LeSving wrote:

the law say that AIP shall be followed

That would be a world’s first. The “I” in AIP stands for “Information”, and that is what the AIP is for according to ICAO. It is usually edited by the aviation authority, which has no law making capacity (it is part of the executive).

Please name that law for me, would be really interesting.

LeSving wrote:

AIP is not law, but the law say that AIP shall be followed.

Certainly not in Sweden. In fact the Swedish AIP still says that both VOR and ADF equipment is required for IFR flight in Sweden, while the Swedish CAA has told me that since part-NCO there is no legal basis for that requirement.

Can you quote chapter and verse of Norwegian legislation?

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden
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