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EASA Ceiling minimums for VFR x-country

So what are they? For example, under EASA can you fly to a destination with a 2000 BKN TAF?

Tököl LHTL

WhiskeyPapa wrote:

So what are they? For example, under EASA can you fly to a destination with a 2000 BKN TAF?

There are no ceiling minimums as such. As long as you can maintain the minimum VFR height, then you are legal.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

Airborne_Again wrote:

As long as you can maintain the minimum VFR height…

… and observe the VFR minima of the airspace you fly through. There still exist some national differences, despite EASA and SERA.

EDDS - Stuttgart

WP,

What do you mean? What did they tell you in flying school?

1. the TAF has no meaning in the VFR, Part-NCO context. Only actual conditions are relevant.

2. why do you mention 2000 BKN?

3. Despite very isolated exceptions (UK) the minimum altitude for VFR is 500 feet AGL (need to stay away from any built-up areas for that, but that can normally be done, if absolutely necessary due to low clouds).

4. Minimum cloud distance depends on the airspace class you are flying in. Hence a global answer to the question is not possible.

But as AA said, there are no minimum ceilings, just minimum altitudes and minimum cloud clearance requirements. Minimum ceilings only exist in CTRs, where these are 1500 feet AGL for VFR and 600 feet AGL for Special VFR.

Frankfurt (EDFZ, EDFE), Germany

boscomantico wrote:

What do you mean? What did they tell you in flying school?

What I was told in flight school was that if I did not want to end up like this it might be a good idea to look at TAFs and SIGWX/TEMSI charts regardless of what the legalities are.

Back when I got my national Norwegian license in 1995 you could not depart on a VFR cross country unless the forecast ceiling on your route was lower than 2000 feet. That was called the “planning minima”. Once launched you only VFR minima distance from clouds and height over ground mattered. I think that was a sensible rule and stick to it still today if I fly VFR.

Last Edited by at 08 Nov 19:37
LFPT, LFPN

Aviathor wrote:

I think that was a sensible rule and stick to it still today if I fly VFR.

+1

Even when flying SE IR I apply a similar rule (1000ft ceiling along the route).

EDDS - Stuttgart

It doesn’t seem like he asked what is sensible or not.

Last Edited by boscomantico at 08 Nov 20:02
Frankfurt (EDFZ, EDFE), Germany

He might be asking about the qualifying cross country flight within PPL training. IME, the UK schools I have hung out at won’t allow that (or any other solo really) unless it is at least 3000ft cloudbase and 10k vis.

A frequent point of utter frustration, especially in nice hazy summers…

Otherwise it is just the VFR minima which is 1500m vis and 500ft AGL, etc. Of course 1500m vis is very poor vis and not navigable using the WW1 methods unless you know the area really well. And 500ft AGL is really dumb too, enroute, normally.

Also a frequent point of utter frustration, if renting, when the CFI or the “club president” says you should not go out in such and such conditions…

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

boscomantico wrote:

…like he asked what…

Since when does it matter what someone asks for on an internet forum? The real interesting bits worth thinking about always come from the discussion that evolves around the original topic.

EDDS - Stuttgart

I asked because someone mentioned I was wrong to launch VFR when the TAF said 2000 BKN. At the time of launch, conditions were VFR. I had to divert because conditions en route got dicey and I was told my decision to go in the first place had violated the rules. I disagreed. The flight as originally planned was perfectly legal. But I raise the question because I began to wonder: maybe there are ceiling requirements, etc.

Last Edited by WhiskeyPapa at 08 Nov 21:09
Tököl LHTL
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