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IFR Enroute charts

Hi

While there is another thread for IPad IAC+Enroute APP, my question regarding the normal IFR enroute chart.
So the question is:
Where can I find the proper enroute charts (Airways, limitations, max direct, Min/Max level) in PDF format?
Jepp is expensive, so that question is about some other source.

Thanks!

Regards,
Alex.

EGTR

There is the NATS SRD document that is updated every 28 days, I think it is a .xls but I am sure there was a .pdf version?

http://www.nats-uk.ead-it.com/public/index.php%3Foption=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=186&Itemid=258.html

Maybe this missing .pdf was not easy for people doing automated stuff
http://www.nats-uk.ead-it.com/aip/current/srd/SRDDOC.pdf

Last Edited by Ibra at 22 Sep 15:30
ESSEX, United Kingdom

@Ibra, aware of this one. But this is SRD, not the airways. And I was looking for the charts…

EGTR
Make Aviation Great Again
Europe/Austria

Snoopy wrote:

In the respective AIP.
https://eaip.austrocontrol.at/lo/200911/enr_6.htm

Does not exist for every country with all the limits.

EGTR
EGTR

There are various free websites carrying airway charts e.g. Skyvector.

I don’t know where they currently get the data from but way back I was involved with beta testing an autorouting product (long before the one you know about) and that had the entire European airway network and that came free from Eurocontrol, machine-readable.

However these airway charts, in whatever form, are of practically no relevance for IFR flying in Europe, unless you have sado masochistic tendencies and want to learn stuff which is of no use All actual flying is done with autorouting tools. I used to get the Jepp low level enroute charts years ago (long story; they [used to] come by post with certain Jepp terminal charting products) and the only use I ever found for them was as sunshields in the cockpit. They were in any case too cluttered; depicting a vast chunk of Europe on one sheet. They were used in the JAA/EASA IR ground school flight planning, which was a complete waste of time since it didn’t work since Eurocontrol got going many years before.

As an aside, one of the lecturers I had for the JAA IR ground school (2011) was an ex RAF mapping guy whose greatest achievement for the human race was the development of a machine which could print out a fanfold map for a flight from anywhere to anywhere on the earth. So if the RAF wanted to invade Australia (this is just an example, you understand; I am not suggesting it would be desirable) their brave men could be issued with a single fanfold chart for the entire flight. Those were the days, when men were men, girls were girls, and life was real. Life would never be the same again.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Peter wrote:

They were in any case too cluttered; depicting a vast chunk of Europe on one sheet. They were used in the JAA/EASA IR ground school flight planning, which was a complete waste of time since it didn’t work since Eurocontrol got going many years before.

Before PBN ops, there were very many fewer waypoints and ATS routes and at that time the enroute charts were actually useful. As you say, today they don’t have any real value.

ESKC (Uppsala/Sundbro), Sweden

The enroute charts were of no use in 2005 when I started flying Eurocontrol IFR in Europe. I got the IR in Feb 2006 but in 2005 was flying long trips with a freelance instructor.

The only country in which you could plan routes on the charts (that actually validated) was France.

Didn’t realise we had more waypoints today… there always seemed to be millions of them, the Autorouter would make use of a lot of them, and ATC disregarded them on the day and always giving you KONAN KOK MAK LNO

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom
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