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EASA compliance on an N number plane (US based jet flying into Europe)

Hi Group! Looking possibly at a Citation Mustang or M2 purchase. Any restrictions now or in the future?

Sam Ferguson
KOCF , United States
Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Okay. To bump this thread a little. And per Peter provide a little more info. Based in the USA with a n numbered plane, looking at a VLJ, what restrictions are in place of foreseen as far as EASA compliance and passing a ramp check. For example Im sure 8.33 spacing on the VHF will be in place. What about CPDLC? Also, does an ADF come in handy over there?

Sam Ferguson
KOCF , United States

These requirements are generally made in the AIP at GEN 1.5 (Aircraft Instruments, Equipment and Flight Documents). You may find these online free of charge for ECAC member states in the AIP library, the European AIS Database (EAD), managed by EUROCONTROL: see https://www.ead.eurocontrol.int/cms-eadbasic/opencms/en/login/ead-basic/

Some other equipment requirements may be made in national regulations but as a third-country operator of a non-commercial you are not required to comply with the air operations or third-country operator rules. The Basic Regulation does empower the Commission to make delegated acts covering these operations, see articles 59 to 61, but no such acts have adopted yet (search at this link). If you intend to operate in one of the UK areas of responsibility then see also the UK Air Navigation Order. An up-to-date version of this is published by UK CAA in CAP 393.

CPDLC is required for flights (under IFR) above FL285. See Commission Regulation (EC) No 29/2009 (link).

RVSM approval from your state of registry is required in EUR RVSM airspace, FL290 to FL410 inclusive.

8.33 kHz voice channel spacing is required unless operating “exclusively in one or more frequency assignments that will remain in 25 kHz channel spacing”: see Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 1079/2012 (link). An 8.33-capable radio is required in UK: see UK AIP SUP 003/2019 in EAD (registration required) or on the NATS AIS website (no registration required) (link).

All UK ATS routes are now RNAV routes at all flight levels. See AIP GEN 1.5. You may need an approval from the state of registry. For a US-registered civil aircraft see ch 7 (Operational Approval Process) in FAA AC 90-105A (link).

VOR, DME, and ADF receivers are required in UK when flying under the IFR in controlled airspace below FL245, and in all airspace at and above FL245. HF RTF is required in the Shanwick OCA. Enhanced Mode S is required in some notified airspace, eg London TMA, elsewhere enhanced Mode S. ACAS II is not required but if voluntarily installed then it must be ver 7.1 (see Part-ACAS).

Last Edited by Qalupalik at 24 Feb 16:25
London

Qalupalik wrote:

CPDLC is required for flights (under IFR) above FL285. See Commission Regulation (EC) No 29/2009 (link).

But most light jets will be exempted from this requirement.

EGTK Oxford

Are you looking to do this in the UK? If so am interested to join. Please PM me!

We're glad you're here
Oxford EGTK

Qalupalik wrote:

All UK ATS routes are now RNAV routes at all flight levels. See AIP GEN 1.5. You may need an approval from the state of registry. For a US-registered civil aircraft see ch 7 (Operational Approval Process) in FAA AC 90-105A (link).

There is no longer a requirement for an operational approval in Europe. Last year, I corresponded with FAA Flight Standard on this topic. They said “Currently we are reviewing at AC 90-96A, and the associated OpSpec and LOA, to determine if they can/should be revised, or even eliminated outright. We agree that the changes to RNAV designations in Europe have made portions, if not the entirety, of AC 90-96A obsolete.”

VOR, DME, and ADF receivers are required in UK when flying under the IFR in controlled airspace below FL245, and in all airspace at and above FL245.

The AIP is hopelessly out of date, as the reference to “EU-OPS” indicates. There is no longer a requirement to that effect (and the table in 5.2.1 is not a notification).

Last Edited by bookworm at 24 Feb 22:26

We agree that the changes to RNAV designations in Europe have made portions, if not the entirety, of AC 90-96A obsolete

Would you be able to elaborate on that one, bookworm?

The RNAV1/PRNAV LoA for N-regs has been a very long standing problem for many years, with no solution in sight but fortunately nobody over here bothering much about it.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

Well the elaboration was in the first sentence: there is no longer a requirement for an operational approval in Europe. The LOA is redundant.

That’s useful to know!

To the OP, one could say that at this level of flying (which will be IFR at high altitude) the basic advice is that IFR is pretty much the same anywhere in the world and certainly Europe isn’t much different. A jet owner will also be much less concerned about airport costs which are a major problem for GA in Europe.

There is a lot of practical advice, and we have had various previous threads e.g. this one on how things differ operationally. Here is another one.

One could make quite a long list…

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom
19 Posts
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