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New Zealand Pilots license in Europe / Jodel on a Permit

This topic has been completely done to death here and elsewhere.

Non-certified aircraft have restrictions in international flight.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

“In some cases it places limitations on allowed ownership. It is the last two being the same which gives you noncommercial worldwide privileges under ICAO i.e. in a certified aircraft”

How ownership is relevant to domestic or international flight? You mean you cant do some flights on rental that you could have done otherwise as owner?

Last Edited by Ibra at 10 Feb 09:55
ESSEX, United Kingdom

LeSving wrote:

BTW, how do you validate the license in the UK?

For non-EASA types, the UK ANO (Air Navigation Order) automatically validates any ICAO compliant pilot license for non-commercial flying.

Andreas IOM

How ownership is relevant to domestic or international flight?

It isn’t relevant to flying, but in some cases ownership is restricted by citizenship. For example an N-reg must be owned by a US citizen or green card holder. G-reg have these requirements copy. And probably similar stuff around the world…

Not applicable in this scenario, AFAICT.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

All interesting stuff again .
As a note for revalidation I pop back to NZ every two years to the Biannual check . NZ medicals can be done at Gatwick.

Scootss90
Mayploe , Kent UK, United Kingdom

Yes, got it, N-reg trust (via a US resident or citizen) is rather an inconvenience from true owners perspective though at the moment this serve the current press very well for “panam-style” stories !

ESSEX, United Kingdom

alioth wrote:

For non-EASA types, the UK ANO (Air Navigation Order) automatically validates any ICAO compliant pilot license for non-commercial flying

Part 6 (Aircrew) of the ANO in the context of recognising or validating flight crew licences does not refer to “EASA types.” The relevant articles expressly refer to EASA and non-EASA aircraft interpreted in schedule 1 as:

“EASA aircraft” means an aircraft which is required by the Basic EASA Regulation and any implementing rules adopted by the Commission in accordance with that Regulation to hold an EASA certificate of airworthiness, an EASA restricted certificate of airworthiness or an EASA permit to fly;

Art 150 only deems an ICAO Annex 1-compliant non-UK flight crew licence—a non-Part-FCL licence granted by another Contracting State, an overseas territories licence, or a Part-FCL licence—valid for a UK-registered non-EASA aircraft so long as it is not flying for the purpose of public transport or commercial air transport. Other commercial operations are not excluded.

For non-EASA aircraft registered other than in UK there is no so-called automatic validation and when they are operated in UK article 148 applies. For non-commercial purposes a licence rendered valid under the ANO is recognised as sufficient by that article but this is not equivalent to validation (automatic or otherwise) for the purpose of flight outside UK. The UK CAA may issue a certificate of validation pursuant to art 169 in respect of any non-Part-FCL or non-UK flight crew licence but only for the purpose of the ANO.

Peter wrote:

… in some cases ownership is restricted by citizenship

Some states require its residents to apply to it for a permission to privately operate, in its airspace, a foreign aircraft. See for example AIP GEN 4.2.1 for Greenland/Denmark:

Note: Article 5 of the Chicago Convention contains an agreement re-
garding flights into, flights across and technical landings. No agree-
ment has, however, been made with foreign state regarding those
cases where a person or an operator (Danish or foreign) residing in
Denmark wants to use a non-Danish registered aircraft for private
flights (including business flights) within Danish territory. Therefore,
in these cases application for permission to carry out such flights
must be submitted to the TS [Danish Transport Authority]

Scootss90 wrote:

… I pop back to NZ every two years to the Biannual check

Are there no NZ flight instructors in the south east?

London

Scootss90 wrote:

As a note for revalidation I pop back to NZ every two years to the Biannual check

On a point of pedantry, if it were a biannual check you’d have to go back every 6 months, I think you mean biennial :-)

Andreas IOM

I did wonder about that after I had posted :)

Scootss90
Mayploe , Kent UK, United Kingdom

Hmm.

IMO you people are over complicating this by an order of magnitude and mixing different things together. The best thing to do is to send e-mails to the CAAs in question and ask.

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