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EASA Journey Log requirements

it’s just to check that the aircraft is not overdue for inspection.

To check that, quite a bit of knowledge is required too. You aren’t required to write servicing details in the journey log, are you? I write in the annual and the other checks but AFAIK that is not required. And you certainly aren’t required to carry servicing logbooks.

My theory is that this requirement originates to catch out unauthorised operations e.g. cabotage, many decades ago.

Administrator
Shoreham EGKA, United Kingdom

And you certainly aren’t required to carry servicing logbooks.

On SE- registry it’s only one book combining journey log and service log.

LDZA LDVA, Croatia

Emir wrote:

On SE- registry it’s only one book combining journey log and service log.

So you have to carry the service log on board? I thought it was 101 that the service log was not taken on the aircraft, so that it doesn’t burn in the wreckage?

EGKB Biggin Hill

Went to GEML Melilla recently. Officially in Schengen, but some special status leads to still having border checks with the rest of the Schengen area (e.g. Moroccan nationals residing in the vicinity are allowed in without passport nor visa, just an ID card, but not to the rest of the Schengen area), and out of the EU customs area.

The customs officers slash border force wanted to see, and took a copy of, registration certificate, insurance, airworthiness certificate, airworthiness review certificate, pilot licence and medical, maybe some other paper I forgot about and… flight plan. That latter, I showed them on a pocket computer, I didn’t have any paper copy. They were quite dismayed as they couldn’t make a copy of that. I told them the Tower most certainly had a copy. One of them went there and came back with a print-out of the flight plan.

No journey log, though :)

ELLX

On my last ramp check in France they wanted to see the Journey Log, then complained that I had not entered the current flight. As they had walked up to the aircraft as I was shutting down I told them I had not had time. They obviously already knew where it was from as I’d booked customs inbound from the UK.

They were not interested in maintenance or licence etc but clearly wanted to know where the aircraft had been on previous flights.

I am F-reg and have to keep a journey logbook. After mx visits the next scheduled inspection time/date is entered as well. I also have all of the journey logs for when it was D- and HA-

Last Edited by zuutroy at 11 May 13:00
EIWT, Ireland

I am F-reg and have to keep a journey logbook

Everybody in Europe has to keep a journey logbook, no matter what the reg..

Mainz (EDFZ), Germany

boscomantico wrote:

Everybody in Europe has to keep a journey logbook, no matter what the reg.

Also for flights that do not cross international borders? The journey log requirement where it applies is archaic nonsense but IIRC the ridiculous ICAO recommendation does not cover domestic flights.

Ted.P wrote:

On my last ramp check in France they wanted to see the Journey Log, then complained that I had not entered the current flight.

I have an old Dutch journey book that started in 2006. It contains an extract of the regulation that requires its filling, and it says:

The PIC must keep, or have another flight crew keep, a journey log where each flight is consigned. With respect to a Dutch aircraft, this must happen during or immediately afterwards each flight (…).

That old regulation is most probably not any more valid in this form, but it always made me feel like even the “immediately after” was meant to be a concession ;-)

ELLX

For all flights,event traffic circuits..
I’m so accustomed to aircraft logbook that I have trouble understanding how you calculate your aircraft flight hours in USA without it? Here it is the basis for everything.. And yes, the inspections are also written into logbook, or at least they used to be, nowadays I get a “logbook entry” which is separate A4.

EETU, Estonia
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